Tumbling quandary

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hemihampton

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each time you tumble a bottle & you switch compounds, you gotta do it in the right order. Meaning if you first use a courser grit, the next grit has got to be finer & next grit even finer then that. If your 3rd grit is not finer then your 2nd grit your going in the wrong direction & it's giving it that haze. LEON.
 

Mailman1960

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each time you tumble a bottle & you switch compounds, you gotta do it in the right order. Meaning if you first use a courser grit, the next grit has got to be finer & next grit even finer then that. If your 3rd grit is not finer then your 2nd grit your going in the wrong direction & it's giving it that haze. LEON.
Your a wise man, the wrong direction is no way to get anywhere
 

SCHistory

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each time you tumble a bottle & you switch compounds, you gotta do it in the right order. Meaning if you first use a courser grit, the next grit has got to be finer & next grit even finer then that. If your 3rd grit is not finer then your 2nd grit your going in the wrong direction & it's giving it that haze. LEON.
I assumed I was using a finer grit with the 1200 AO?
 

hemihampton

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you need something finer then 1500 grit aluminum oxide.
 

embe

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Almost looks hazier than it went in? Sure the crud was removed, but probably along with some of the original glossier parts of the surface. If that's now the case, yes you need to go finer grit to remove the haze created by the coarser grit.
 

Vinewood

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Everyone,
Here is an important point to remember about grit ratings. The claimed grit rating of manufacturer A's silicon carbide or aluminum oxide is often NOT the same as manufacturer B's grit rating of what you think is the same product. Add to that, that most vendors do not tell you who actually manufactured the compounds they are selling. The only real way to compare grit ratings between manufacturers is IF you can get the average MICRON SIZE of the particles in the cutting or polishing compounds.
I personally own and have tested 15 different batches of silicon carbide and aluminum oxide on the same type of glass marbles. I put the compound, copper and water in small plastic jars and tumbled them all at the same time in larger tubes for three days. I removed and labeled them and then rated all my compounds from most aggressive (cutting agents) to least aggressive (best polishing agents).
I plan to phase out some of my choices and narrow it down to 5 or 6 compounds for cutting and polishing.
The Hostetter's bitters shown in the early photos in this thread appears to have been cut and is now ready for polishing with a true 5 micron size aluminum oxide polish like the Jar Doctor sells.
Also, when I fill my canisters, the level of copper is only 2 to 3 inches from the top of a standard bitters or soda, so that there will be enough when lying flat, with the added length of the stopple cone and/or fingers. My water level is just below the top of the bottle.
 
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