Victorian Ironstone Found, Repaired and Put Back to Use

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UnderMiner

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I was digging at my 1924-capped landfill last week looking for bottles when I saw the outline of a white ceramic rim appear about 2 feet under the bottom layer of mud. Encased in several layers of compacted newspaper I imagined this artifact could still be in good condition. I took my time and slowly excavated it. It wasn't easy as at this depth the ground rapidly floods with black watery mud.

I finally extracted the artifact and discovered it was a Victorian age ironstone soup tureen. The only damage was one of the handles was snapped off. I found the handle inside the bowl - meaning someone had likely intended to repair it, but as old ironstone was not in fashion by the 1920's they instead threw it away still wrapped in the newspaper they had wrapped it in - protecting it for a century under ground.

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With the modern invention of Krazy Glue I repaired the broken handle in a way the previous owner couldn't have ever imagined, and put the bowl back to use to hold fruit on my table.

This is everything I found that day:
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Included is a very interesting bottle, the brown Huebner beer bottle from Toledo has a joke written on the bottom - under "Contents 12 Fluid Ounces" it reads "Pure and without Drugs or Poison" this may sound like a serious claim to us imagining the backward nature of these old times, but it's not a serious claim, it's a joke. The "Pure and without Drugs or Poison" is a jab at the Temperance Movement who made absurd claims including that beer contained drugs and poison, which was widely understood to be complete nonsense and shoudn't be used be as an excuse to enact prohibition which hadn't been passed yet, but was getting close.

The metal cross with swords is a 1917 Croix de Guerre, if you ever needed proof that many WWI veterans threw away their medals after returning home look no further. This medal for bravery could only have ended up here if it was intentionally thrown away.
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A soldier wearing a Croix de Guerre:
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The ten pin bottle is an interesting piece as well, it is from the Carl H. Schwartz Central Park Mineral Spring.
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In 1868 there was a natural spring that flowed in NYC's Central Park and a large wooden pavilion was built around it.
mineralpavilionnyplpostcard.jpg

You could buy the water from this pavilion until the 1920's in these bottles which retained this same design for the entirety of its operations, starting with hand blown blob-top bottles and ending with the machined crown top pictured above.

The pavilion was demolished in the 1950's after serving as a candy and soda shop for 30 years after the spring water operation stopped.

The rectangular Nujol bottle was a health supplement made by Standard Oil. It was litterally just distilled crude oil that without a doubt was loaded with carcinogens. Sold for cheap it was snatched up by people on a budget in place of more expensive and safer health oils like Cod Liver Oil. I don't know how the 1906-founded FDA permitted the sale of Nujol through the first half of the 20th century, but it probably came down to bribes, and lots of them.
 

Sitcoms

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A bunch of great finds! I've actually done a similar process with an orange ceramic bowl I found in a late 20s-early 30s dump. Still trying to clean it up a bit, but the crack was clean and I have hopes of repairing someday!
 

UnderMiner

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A bunch of great finds! I've actually done a similar process with an orange ceramic bowl I found in a late 20s-early 30s dump. Still trying to clean it up a bit, but the crack was clean and I have hopes of repairing someday!
Thanks! Just be careful with Pre-WWII orange ceramic, it often contained Uranium Oxide.
 

CanadianBottles

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Great finds, especially the medal! That's something I've always wanted to find, closest I've come is WWII military uniform buttons. That Central Park ten-pin is great too!

"Pure without drugs or poison" wasn't a joke, it was required to comply with Michigan law: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015066990584&seq=8&q1=drugs+or+poison&start=1 (see page 2, section VIII). I have absolutely no idea what this was supposed to practically accomplish, but it remained in force for decades. I don't know of any national or other state laws requiring this text, but presumably it appeared on the bottles of any brewery which intended to do business in Michigan, the same way that up here in Canada anything that contains lead will carry a warning about how it can cause birth defects in California.

And you'd be surprised about Nujol. While the brand has disappeared, distilled petroleum (sold as mineral oil) is still commonly used in modern medicine as a laxative, and is available over the counter from any pharmacy: https://www.cvs.com/shop/cvs-health-mineral-oil-usp-lubricant-laxative-prodid-1011823 Once it's been distilled enough it's no longer carcinogenic, it just flows right through the intestines without significantly interacting with the body.
 

hemihampton

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I agree with Canadian Bottles, Being from Michigan it's common on most michigan Bottles & was a serious statement. From what I remember it had something to due with homemade bathtub gin/liquor being toxic & poisonous killing people. Leon.

MuskegonBreweryBottle.JPG
 
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DeepSeaDan

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View attachment 250475I was digging at my 1924-capped landfill last week looking for bottles when I saw the outline of a white ceramic rim appear about 2 feet under the bottom layer of mud. Encased in several layers of compacted newspaper I imagined this artifact could still be in good condition. I took my time and slowly excavated it. It wasn't easy as at this depth the ground rapidly floods with black watery mud.

I finally extracted the artifact and discovered it was a Victorian age ironstone soup tureen. The only damage was one of the handles was snapped off. I found the handle inside the bowl - meaning someone had likely intended to repair it, but as old ironstone was not in fashion by the 1920's they instead threw it away still wrapped in the newspaper they had wrapped it in - protecting it for a century under ground.

View attachment 250471

View attachment 250473

With the modern invention of Krazy Glue I repaired the broken handle in a way the previous owner couldn't have ever imagined, and put the bowl back to use to hold fruit on my table.

This is everything I found that day:
View attachment 250472

Included is a very interesting bottle, the brown Huebner beer bottle from Toledo has a joke written on the bottom - under "Contents 12 Fluid Ounces" it reads "Pure and without Drugs or Poison" this may sound like a serious claim to us imagining the backward nature of these old times, but it's not a serious claim, it's a joke. The "Pure and without Drugs or Poison" is a jab at the Temperance Movement who made absurd claims including that beer contained drugs and poison, which was widely understood to be complete nonsense and shoudn't be used be as an excuse to enact prohibition which hadn't been passed yet, but was getting close.

The metal cross with swords is a 1917 Croix de Guerre, if you ever needed proof that many WWI veterans threw away their medals after returning home look no further. This medal for bravery could only have ended up here if it was intentionally thrown away.
View attachment 250476
View attachment 250477
A soldier wearing a Croix de Guerre:
View attachment 250480

The ten pin bottle is an interesting piece as well, it is from the Carl H. Schwartz Central Park Mineral Spring.
View attachment 250478
In 1868 there was a natural spring that flowed in NYC's Central Park and a large wooden pavilion was built around it.
View attachment 250479
You could buy the water from this pavilion until the 1920's in these bottles which retained this same design for the entirety of its operations, starting with hand blown blob-top bottles and ending with the machined crown top pictured above.

The pavilion was demolished in the 1950's after serving as a candy and soda shop for 30 years after the spring water operation stopped.

The rectangular Nujol bottle was a health supplement made by Standard Oil. It was litterally just distilled crude oil that without a doubt was loaded with carcinogens. Sold for cheap it was snatched up by people on a budget in place of more expensive and safer health oils like Cod Liver Oil. I don't know how the 1906-founded FDA permitted the sale of Nujol through the first half of the 20th century, but it probably came down to bribes, and lots of them.
Wow U-M, excellent pics and information! The tureen is killer! I'm just setting up to glue the crack in my recently-found Chamber Pot; when I brought it home, the Missuss wasn't amused, especially when I said I'd serve mash potatoes in it to the Bottle Diving Brothers at my next BBQ ( she turned green ). To add to the mirth & merriment, we talked to our Son ( Facetime ) a few days later and when I showed the pot to him, he immediately said: "That'd be a great pot for mashed potatoes!" ( she turned greener ) - what's that they say about the 'apple not falling far from the tree'??

Thanks for sharing your treasures!
 

UnderMiner

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Great finds, especially the medal! That's something I've always wanted to find, closest I've come is WWII military uniform buttons. That Central Park ten-pin is great too!

"Pure without drugs or poison" wasn't a joke, it was required to comply with Michigan law: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015066990584&seq=8&q1=drugs+or+poison&start=1 (see page 2, section VIII). I have absolutely no idea what this was supposed to practically accomplish, but it remained in force for decades. I don't know of any national or other state laws requiring this text, but presumably it appeared on the bottles of any brewery which intended to do business in Michigan, the same way that up here in Canada anything that contains lead will carry a warning about how it can cause birth defects in California.

And you'd be surprised about Nujol. While the brand has disappeared, distilled petroleum (sold as mineral oil) is still commonly used in modern medicine as a laxative, and is available over the counter from any pharmacy: https://www.cvs.com/shop/cvs-health-mineral-oil-usp-lubricant-laxative-prodid-1011823 Once it's been distilled enough it's no longer carcinogenic, it just flows right through the intestines without significantly interacting with the body.
Excellent clarifications! Thank you @CanadianBottles :D
 

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