Dug a Slug plate Pepsi

Welcome to our Antique Bottle community

Be a part of something great, join today!

Still

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2022
Messages
123
Reaction score
309
Points
63
Location
SoCal and North Carolina
Pepsi hutches did exist. Though Burlington did not produce any recorded Pepsi hutches. It was a blob top
I've noticed most bottle diggers on youtube, especially in the South, find alot of Hutchinson style and crown top soda bottles. In contrast here in NYC old soda bottles are quite rare, I mostly find beer bottles instead. The only old soda bottles I typically find are Clicquot Club bottles from the 1920's, this soda was popular here, but the bottles are plain and boring looking. Beer was way more popular than soda here, in fact I believe NYC had the most breweries in the whole county back then. I need to study more about sodas and get down to Alabama one day to find some good ones.
Very true I find. I think beers didn’t preform well here in the South mainly because of the costs of transporting such goods to the South. Sure you had railroad but it had to be expensive to move these goods for lots of weight reasons. Via ship may also have been possible for port cities. Burlington is fairly inland and was only really accessible by rail and dirt road. I’m not going to lie, digging sodas ALL THE TIME (especially the root glass ones which flash all the time) does get relatively boring after a while. I wish I could find a nice beer here intact.
Most people also here had quite a sweet tooth and they sure loved their sodas
 

willong

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
1,023
Reaction score
997
Points
113
Location
Port Angeles, WA
I've noticed most bottle diggers on youtube, especially in the South, find alot of Hutchinson style and crown top soda bottles. In contrast here in NYC old soda bottles are quite rare, I mostly find beer bottles instead. The only old soda bottles I typically find are Clicquot Club bottles from the 1920's, this soda was popular here, but the bottles are plain and boring looking. Beer was way more popular than soda here, in fact I believe NYC had the most breweries in the whole county back then. I need to study more about sodas and get down to Alabama one day to find some good ones.
I'm guessing climate of both regions is a factor in the relative popularity of sodas vs. beer, especially before industrial refrigeration was common. Traditions of the ethnic populations predominating probably played a part too! Lots of alcohol-loving immigrants first settled in the big northern cities. I'm ignorant of many of my ancestors, but I know both the German and the Scots Irish imbibed. And a Celtic ancestor of the family landed in Philly area, worked off passage, before eventually splaying out onto what was then the frontier in Ohio and western Pennsylvania.
 

UnderMiner

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2020
Messages
594
Reaction score
1,363
Points
93
I'm guessing climate of both regions is a factor in the relative popularity of sodas vs. beer, especially before industrial refrigeration was common. Traditions of the ethnic populations predominating probably played a part too! Lots of alcohol-loving immigrants first settled in the big northern cities. I'm ignorant of many of my ancestors, but I know both the German and the Scots Irish imbibed. And a Celtic ancestor of the family landed in Philly area, worked off passage, before eventually splaying out onto what was then the frontier in Ohio and western Pennsylvania.
This is true in regard to both climate and the tradition of the population. NYC from the mid-late 19th century was flooded with immigrants from Ireland and Germany. The Germans in particular had a long history of brewing quality beer which then continued in the North East US.

The Old Croton Aquaduct brought fresh water down to NYC in massive amounts as early as the summer of 1842, falling perfectly in line with the arrival of these beer-brewing aficionados. Then in about 1890 the New Croton Aquaduct opened and increased the water supply ten fold expanding to all five Boroughs, making NYC water the cheapest, cleanest, and most abundant in the nation. This allowed breweries to operate in their hundreds perhaps even their thousands.

Then the temperance movement came along and crashed the entire industry to the ground. Many people don't realize how awful prohibition was in regard to NYC's economy and industry. Breweries, bottling plants, glass factories, crate and barrel makers, wagon drivers, warehouse workers, retail stores, all these industries and more were affected. Many breweries held out into the mid-1920's brewing low alcohol beer, but soon shuttered and many men were unemployed, then the crash of 1929 happened and boy oh boy did things get bad.

I sometimes think of the day Prohibition went into effect as the true start of the Great Depression, because this effected the working classes immediately and completely ruined entire traditions and lifestyles overnight.
 

Tony Kendzior

Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2015
Messages
24
Reaction score
34
Points
13
Location
Gainesville, FL
Mine is not a slug plate Pepsi like yours. But it is old and was dug by me in St. Augustine in a dump along the coastal waterway in about 1965.
 

Attachments

  • 81a-PepsiCola.jpg
    81a-PepsiCola.jpg
    77.6 KB · Views: 67
  • 81b-PepsiCola.jpg
    81b-PepsiCola.jpg
    107.2 KB · Views: 71

willong

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
1,023
Reaction score
997
Points
113
Location
Port Angeles, WA
This is true in regard to both climate and the tradition of the population. NYC from the mid-late 19th century was flooded with immigrants from Ireland and Germany. The Germans in particular had a long history of brewing quality beer which then continued in the North East US.

The Old Croton Aquaduct brought fresh water down to NYC in massive amounts as early as the summer of 1842, falling perfectly in line with the arrival of these beer-brewing aficionados. Then in about 1890 the New Croton Aquaduct opened and increased the water supply ten fold expanding to all five Boroughs, making NYC water the cheapest, cleanest, and most abundant in the nation. This allowed breweries to operate in their hundreds perhaps even their thousands.

Then the temperance movement came along and crashed the entire industry to the ground. Many people don't realize how awful prohibition was in regard to NYC's economy and industry. Breweries, bottling plants, glass factories, crate and barrel makers, wagon drivers, warehouse workers, retail stores, all these industries and more were affected. Many breweries held out into the mid-1920's brewing low alcohol beer, but soon shuttered and many men were unemployed, then the crash of 1929 happened and boy oh boy did things get bad.

I sometimes think of the day Prohibition went into effect as the true start of the Great Depression, because this effected the working classes immediately and completely ruined entire traditions and lifestyles overnight.
I've never lived or worked east of The Upper Midwest, and that for barely two years. Once, I did stumble upon an interesting article or video documentary about one of New York's aqueducts, though it concerned a more modern project. I didn't realized such impressive public works projects dated to the 1840's in our country, though I do recall singing "Erie Canal" in elementary school class in the 1950's. You provide interesting insight into how the Croton Aqueduct combined with influx of German immigrants to spur multiple industries.

I am inclined to think that ideologues enforcing their views and infringing basic liberty is rarely a good thing. Throw cronyism and graft into the mix and things do indeed "get bad."
 

Still

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2022
Messages
123
Reaction score
309
Points
63
Location
SoCal and North Carolina
This is true in regard to both climate and the tradition of the population. NYC from the mid-late 19th century was flooded with immigrants from Ireland and Germany. The Germans in particular had a long history of brewing quality beer which then continued in the North East US.

The Old Croton Aquaduct brought fresh water down to NYC in massive amounts as early as the summer of 1842, falling perfectly in line with the arrival of these beer-brewing aficionados. Then in about 1890 the New Croton Aquaduct opened and increased the water supply ten fold expanding to all five Boroughs, making NYC water the cheapest, cleanest, and most abundant in the nation. This allowed breweries to operate in their hundreds perhaps even their thousands.

Then the temperance movement came along and crashed the entire industry to the ground. Many people don't realize how awful prohibition was in regard to NYC's economy and industry. Breweries, bottling plants, glass factories, crate and barrel makers, wagon drivers, warehouse workers, retail stores, all these industries and more were affected. Many breweries held out into the mid-1920's brewing low alcohol beer, but soon shuttered and many men were unemployed, then the crash of 1929 happened and boy oh boy did things get bad.

I sometimes think of the day Prohibition went into effect as the true start of the Great Depression, because this effected the working classes immediately and completely ruined entire traditions and lifestyles overnight.
To your point the Temperance movement of the 1870s to 1890s was especially prevalent in the south. Probably was a big influencing factor into the beverage choices of the locals. Good point
 

Latest posts

Members online

No members online now.

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
83,306
Messages
743,496
Members
24,337
Latest member
Sparkey
Top