Welcome to our Antique Bottles Community

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Antique Bottle Community on the Web.

Register Log in

Dug this nice green champagne today

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
2,261
113
New Jersey
No it is not a turn mold bottle
In the picture I sent the one on the right is a turn mold bottle, no seam. The darker one on the right is blown in a mold, lip is applied. I have found and dug alot. All are slicks. I saw windows in Fort Ticonderoga that were made up of turn mold bottle bottoms. It was very neat. I wish I had a picture. I don't have enough yet but I find them often enough. One day maybe.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

east texas terry

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2019
196
63
Bobby you are right this is a turn mold bottle the seam all the way to the top Do think a 1930 or i940
east texas terry
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
2,261
113
New Jersey
I believe they are wine bottles not champagne. The kick up was for impurities in wine to settle. Maybe a wives tale. Not sure how old because wine bottle are not my forte. I believe they used this type of bottle later on in other countries. I think I may need help with this one. Hope I helped a little.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

Harry Pristis

Well-Known Member
Jul 24, 2003
1,075
83
Northcentral Florida
Turning a bottle in a mold obliterates side seams. I can't recall ever seeing a French wine bottle with side seams. Terry's bottle appears to be a French champagne which must be a turn-mold bottle to be consistent with the form.

There is a subtle difference between the forms of champagne and burgundy bottles, but all these bottle forms are turn-molds.

Sediment trap is a collector myth. The kick-up began as a way to put a flat bottom rim on a free-blown bottle. The kick-up is retained in these French traditional forms, even though it no longer has any function. On early wine bottles, an exaggerated kick-up offered the bonus of keeping finger away from sharp glass pontil scars.

4wineshapesB.JPG
 

east texas terry

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2019
196
63
I believe they are wine bottles not champagne. The kick up was for impurities in wine to settle. Maybe a wives tale. Not sure how old because wine bottle are not my forte. I believe they used this type of bottle later on in other countries. I think I may need help with this one. Hope I helped a little.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
Turning a bottle in a mold obliterates side seams. I can't recall ever seeing a French wine bottle with side seams. Terry's bottle appears to be a French champagne which must be a turn-mold bottle to be consistent with the form.

There is a subtle difference between the forms of champagne and burgundy bottles, but all these bottle forms are turn-molds.

Sediment trap is a collector myth. The kick-up began as a way to put a flat bottom rim on a free-blown bottle. The kick-up is retained in these French traditional forms, even though it no longer has any function. On early wine bottles, an exaggerated kick-up offered the bonus of keeping finger away from sharp glass pontil scars.

View attachment 217640
Thank,s for the
Turning a bottle in a mold obliterates side seams. I can't recall ever seeing a French wine bottle with side seams. Terry's bottle appears to be a French champagne which must be a turn-mold bottle to be consistent with the form.

There is a subtle difference between the forms of champagne and burgundy bottles, but all these bottle forms are turn-molds.

Sediment trap is a collector myth. The kick-up began as a way to put a flat bottom rim on a free-blown bottle. The kick-up is retained in these French traditional forms, even though it no longer has any function. On early wine bottles, an exaggerated kick-up offered the bonus of keeping finger away from sharp glass pontil scars.

View attachment 217640
Turning a bottle in a mold obliterates side seams. I can't recall ever seeing a French wine bottle with side seams. Terry's bottle appears to be a French champagne which must be a turn-mold bottle to be consistent with the form.

There is a subtle difference between the forms of champagne and burgundy bottles, but all these bottle forms are turn-molds.

Sediment trap is a collector myth. The kick-up began as a way to put a flat bottom rim on a free-blown bottle. The kick-up is retained in these French traditional forms, even though it no longer has any function. On early wine bottles, an exaggerated kick-up offered the bonus of keeping finger away from sharp glass pontil scars.

View attachment 217640
thank for info
Terry
 

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
77,447
Messages
702,521
Members
19,164
Latest member
SJC Museum
Top