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Brendec7

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Good morning. I live in New Jersey and recently came into possession of a large quantity of glass bottles from what appears to be a 1930s dump site. I am having trouble identifying a couple of the bottles and hope members here can assist!. The first one is small (just under 5” tall) clear glass and is flat on one side. The other two are clear glass about 8 1/2” tall and have texture on sides and a flat area where i assume was a paper label. They seem like they could be liquor bottles as they both are embossed with “federal law, forbid, sale, or reuse of this bottle“.Thank you in advance. Regards, Brenda
 

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Sitcoms

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Hello and welcome to the forum!

Hard to know exactly what these were or when they were made unless you recognize the particular bottle since they are sans label. I think these are a bit more modern than 1930s; probably 40s through early 60s based on my experience. The "Federal Law Prohibits" wordage was required on all liquor bottles in the U.S. from 1935 until 1964, though it was still used into the 1970s as makers didn't want to spend the money on new molds. Here's more information on that if you'd like to read: https://glassbottlemarks.com/federal-law-forbids-sale-or-reuse-of-this-bottle-marking/

I'd guess the small bottle was probably like shampoo, or some kind of liquid flavoring extract based on the size/shape/closure, and would of had a paper label on the flat side.
The squared liquor bottle might have been a gin or whiskey, paying homage to earlier bottles that were in a somewhat similar shape; I assume the bottom of this one is picture three. If so, I don't recognize that particular makers mark, and it seems all of the numbers have no meaning outside of that bottle company's walls.
The more squat liquor bottle is giving off wine bottle vibes to me, but could easily have been a fancier whisky or something similar. I assume the bottom of that bottle is number 2, and if so that bottle was made by the Owens-Illinois Glass Co. in 1943 (date code is to the right on their bottles), though I can't find any plant #56 for them.

Hope this helps!
 

Brendec7

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Thank you for taking the time to reply! The information is interesting !
 

CanadianBottles

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The square one is proportioned exactly like a classic Gordon's Dry Gin bottle, although they had changed the shape of their bottles by that point so I imagine it was a smaller competitor trying to cash in on the memory of the Gordon's bottle looking like that a couple decades earlier.
 

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