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GLENSHAW GLASS COMPANY ~ PENNSYLVANIA ~ BOTTLE DATE CODES ~ BRIEF HISTORY ~ ETC.

SODAPOPBOB

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2010
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I've been talking about starting this thread for at least a week now but because of the overwhelming amount of information I found, it delayed me in posting it. My biggest challenge was to try and glean the information into a simple format without getting too far afield with stuff that was of no particular interest and yet still be able to capture the attention of soda bottle collectors in particular. I hope the end result will justify the means. This is a work in progress and I still have some organizing to do, but I can think of no better place to start than with this brief history of the Glenshaw Glass Company. It has all the key elements that will help tie together the information that will eventually follow. I consider this the best brief history of the company available and hope you find it informative. The two attachments are original newspaper articles, and both incidents are mentioned in the brief history. Within the next few days I will be adding information specific to Glenshaw bottles, some of which I believe will give us a better understanding of the mysterious lip codes. But for now, please familiarize yourself with the brief history and the accompanying attachments. I hope this will emphasize the difficulties the Glenshaw Glass Company had during it's early years of operation. Note: I'm posting the link to the brief history on the following post because it is one of those super-long links and I don't want it to mess up the text here. Attachments From ... 1. Pittston Gazette ~ Pittston, Pennsylvania ~ May 20, 19032. The Evening News ~ Harrisburg, Pennsylvania ~ December 17, 1917
 

Attachments

SODAPOPBOB

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2010
11,502
0
The main reason I'm starting with pictures of the Glenshaw factory is to help illustrate the stark reality that the soda bottles we collect, discuss, and in some respects cherish, actually came from a bunch of old buildings and warehouses that were often unkempt, hot, smelly, and in many ways contradictory to the finished products (bottles) that were perfectly shaped, gleaming, and finished to perfection for the sole purpose of providing us with a refreshing cold drink. I for one prefer the romanticism of the bottles and their history a lot more than I do of the fact they are in reality just hardened molten glass intended to hold a beverage and then be tossed away.
 

SODAPOPBOB

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2010
11,502
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Meet ...

John Jacob Meyer ... a.k.a. ... Jacob J ~ Jakob J ~ Jachob J

Born: 1855
Died: 1921

If you read the brief history about the Glenshaw Glass Company you will recall that in 1895 a Jacob Meyer joined the company who provided financial backing and at the time there were four other partners. Well, the long story short is, the four other partners seem to disappear from the records early on and its Jacob Meyer and his sons who come to the forefront. Even though I haven't any records saying as much, I have to assume Jacob bought out the others and became the sole owner. Another interesting and challenging aspect about Jacob is that his first name is sometimes listed as John and sometimes listed as Jacob, with the spelling of Jacob sometimes being with a k as in Jakob or with an h as in Jachob. But irregardless of all that, it seems he went by his middle name of Jacob. (As near as I can determine his real first name was John, but because most accounts list him as Jacob I will use that name whenever referring to him).

I only mention Jacob to establish a timeframe and connection to the Glenshaw Glass Company, but its one of his sons, who I will introduce you to next, that plays the most important role in the story that follows.

[ Images ]

1. 1900 U.S. Census
2. Cropped portion with spouse and children
3. Cropped portion with occupation for Jachob as Glass Mfg. (Glass Manufacturer)
 

Attachments

SODAPOPBOB

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2010
11,502
0
Fast forwarding to 1931 and 1932 we find the Glenshaw Glass Company being accused by the Government of producing 390,000 illegal bottles during Prohibition. Apparently the bottles in question were embossed with various names of whiskey, gin, etc. Notice in the first article where Samuel and George Meyer denied the bottles were intended to be used for distribution but agreed to destroy them anyway. And then just four days later the second article shows the 380,000 bottles were scheduled to be broken, which apparently was going to take fifteen men six days to accomplish. Hmm, the first article says 390,000 bottles but the second article says 380,000 bottles. I wonder what happened to the other 10,000? Oh, I see now, they actually said "approximately." Yeah, right! I can just see someone counting that many bottles. What probably happened is they stashed away 10,000 to be used when Prohibition was over.

As if the company didn't have enough problems to deal with, we see in May of 1932 where they had another fire, this time destroying 500,000 bottles. Man-o-man, do the math! I bet someone was upset.

Reminder: Samuel and George's father, Jacob Meyer, had been deceased for about ten years in 1931.

Articles From ...

1. The News Herald ~ Franklin, Pennsylvania ~ September 25, 1931
2. The Evening News ~ Harrisburg, Pennsylvania ~ September 29, 1931
3. The News Herald ~ Franklin, Pennsylvania ~ May 27, 1932

(To be continued and getting closer to the as yet unmentioned other brother)
 

Attachments

SODAPOPBOB

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2010
11,502
0
Meet the other brother ... Albert Christian Meyer ... Son of Jacob Meyer Born: 1883Died: 1955 ~ 72 years old I have more information about Albert to follow but will start with his most notable achievement. Albert designed and patented the famous 1938 Hires Root Beer bottle which became recognizable worldwide. The bottle initially had a foil label and eventually became an ACL. Here's the link to the patent. Notice that Albert was an assignor to the Glenshaw Glass Company. Just click on the small image of the bottle and then after that click where it says "Original Image" to examine the bottle design close up. https://www.google.com/patents/USD111212?dq=bottle+111212&hl=en&sa=X&ei=vSg7VKzzHsKSyATG5IDQCQ&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA Filed June 17, 1938Published September 13, 1938Design Patent Number 111,212 [ Attachments ] 1. Patent Image2. Example of foil label bottle
 

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