Himmelreich & Bell Leesport PA

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acooks

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I have recently took up bottle digging and have had some great finds at a spot I found in South Jersey. I am hoping the experts here have some insight to the bottle below. I have researched and really just want to know what its contents may of been. I know it is late 1800's but not sure of anything else. Thanks so much and it is great to be a part of the group.

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Wheelah23

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Welcome to the forum! Sounds like you have a great first dump to dig. It looks to be a small time drug store bottle. You are spot on about the date. It could've held any kind of medicine, and it would've had a paper label on the back identifying the contents. One with a label sold on eBay in 2007.

Where are you in South Jersey? I've been digging for a year, mostly up here in north Jersey though. But I go down to Manahawkin sometimes during the summer to visit my grandma. I haven't been able to find a dump yet, and it's driving me crazy. Maybe we could get together, let me know.
 

surfaceone

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Hello Aaron,

Welcome and thanks for bringing the druggist bottle. There was inter-marrying going on in Leesport, once upon a time.

"BELL, SAMUEL H.

p. 1015

Surnames: HIMMELREICH, DUNKELBERGER, BOHN, PHILLIPS, RITTER, LEIBEL, BENNETHUM, MOYER, KIRBY, LANDIS, DIETRICH, STUBBS, LEBO, KERSHNER,

Samuel H. Bell, druggist, located at No. 817 Penn street, Reading, Pa., was born at West Leesport, Berks county, in 1867, son of Samuel and Emma (Himmelreich) Bell, and a descendant of James Bell, who emigrated from Belfast, Ireland.

James Bell was one of three brothers who came to America from Belfast in their young manhood. One of the brothers was a miller, and built a grist mill which afterward became Bushong's paper mill, but was for a long time known as Bell's mill. Samuel, one of the three brothers, settled in Schuylkill county, and had a son Samuel, and among his descendants is the Hon. James M. Bell, of Philadelphia.

James Bell, son of James, the emigrant, was born in Reading in 1812, and there he died Feb. 3, 1879. He was a clerk in the court house for eighteen years, though in his earlier life worked at the tailor's trade. He was a member of the First Reformed Church of Reading, and was its treasurer at the time the church was rebuilt. His remains rest in the Charles Evans cemetery. He married Sarah Dunkelberger, daughter of Peter and Magdalena (Bohn) Dunkelberger, and their children were: Thomas J. and William both died in infancy; Mary Jane m. the late James Phillips, and resides in Philadelphia; James, a soldier in the 93d P. V. I., was killed in the second battle of Chancellorsville at Salem Heights, in the Civil War; Samuel; Sarah Ann m. Isaac Ritter, and died in Philadelphia; Volney is buried in the Charles Evans cemetery; Robert Bruce is also buried in the Charles Evans cemetery; Rebecca died unmarried; Emma m. Conneberd Leibel of Reading; and Charles is a stationary engineer for the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company, at Reading.

Samuel Bell, son of James, and now a successful stove and tinware merchant at West Leesport, was born Sept. 2, 1841, in Maiden-creek, (now Ontelaunee) township. His first work was in a brick yard at Leesport, where he remained one season, and then he drove mules on the towpath on the Schuylkill canal during the seasons of 1857, 1858 and 1859. In 1860 he went to Reading and learned the tinsmith's trade with Henry Bennethum, then located at the corner of Fifth and Court streets, and this trade he has followed ever since, still doing repairing, tin-roofing and spouting. In 1863 he opened his present shop at West Leesport, and this he has carried on continuously. He has a full line of tinware, ranges, heaters, etc. In September, 1862, he enlisted at Reading in Co. G, Capt. Charles Bickel's Company, and saw active service at Hagerstown, Md., where they were shelled by Gen. Imboden, who was stationed on the opposite side of the Potomac river. He enlisted again in June, 1863, in Company G, 42d Pennsylvania regiment, for the three months' service. He was at the old Walnut school-house in 1863, and stood at Sixth and Walnut streets, when the soldiers were receiving their pay. Mr. Bell is a member of the United Evangelical Church, which he joined in 1873. He is one of the most active workers of Bethany congregation at West Leesport, where for many years he was class leader, and has been exhorter and trustee. For a quarter of a century he has been superintendent of the Sunday-school, and is present at his post every Sunday. Mr. Bell's residence is on Main street. On Feb. 2, 1862, he married Emma Himmelreich, daughter of Amos D. and Elizabeth (Moyer) Himmelreich, and they have become the parents of seven sons and five daughters, as follows: William H., of West Leesport; Carrie, m. to Jacob Kirby, of Paulsboro, N. J.; Samuel H.; James R., of No. 1005 Oley street, Reading; Rebecca L., unmarried; George, who died in 1907; Emma, m. to Edward Landis, of Reading; Amos H., m. to Ida M. Dietrich, daughter of Charles Dietrich, of Kutztown, and they have a son, Lincoln; Mary, deceased; Laura M. and Edward A., unmarried; and Robert, deceased.

Samuel H. Bell was educated in the West Leesport schools and in Stoner's Business College, Reading, graduating in 1887. He learned telegraphy at the age of fourteen, and followed that profession as an operator and special agent for the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company, for eleven years, doing duty at different points. In 1892 he went to New Jersey and accepted a position with the South Amboy Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad, where he remained more than a year. From this position he entered the store of the great merchant John Wanamaker at Philadelphia, with whom he continued for three years in the capacity of bookkeeper. From there he entered the employ of the Adams Express Company as bill clerk, in their offices at Seventeenth and Market streets, but failing health caused him to resign and in February, 1894, he came to Reading. Here Mr. Bell became floor walker with the large firm of Dives, Pomeroy & Stewart, where he remained two years.

Mr. Bell then entered the drug business, and was associated with Clarence T. Stubbs, No. 751 Penn street, for eight years, during this time having full charge of the store. On Dec. 13, 1902, he engaged in the drug business on his own account, establishing his drug and prescription store at its present location, No. 817 Penn street.

Mr. Bell is one of Reading's promising business men, having the largest exclusive retail drug store in the City, and in connection has one of the most complete prescription departments, Mr. Charles S. Lebo, a graduate in pharmacy, with first honors in his class at Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, being the manager of this department.

Mr. Bell married Lillie M. Kershner, daughter of John S. Kershner, of Shoemakersville, Berks county. They are members of St. Paul's United Evangelical Church, O. U. A. M.; Fraternity Castle, No 302, I. G. E.; Mystic Star Commandery, No. 47, A. and I. O. Knights of Malta; Lodge No. 115, B. P. O. Elks, Reading, and the Modern Woodmen of America." From.

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acooks

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Thanks so much. I am near Philly and have definitely found a few cool spots. I would love to dig together sometime. In fact I have a few spots that would be better with two. Have a great spot on some railroad tracks that has to be investigated much more. Walked through yesterday and found hundreds of Railroad marbles , and to my dismay some of the oldest broken bottles for me to date on the dirt slopes of the tracks. plus stoneware and old RR glass parts. Not sure if the dump is undiscovered or they are just bottles that were thrown during construction and are now surfacing. Here is a picture of a few of the peices of glass i picked up. Thanks again and I look forward to hitting a dig with you soon. I want to go down to May's Landing and hit some spots. I have an old schooler that may get me in on some spots. He started digging in the 30's. Heading to Ohio for the weekend and may hit some spots on Route 30 as well. Have a great day and stay in touch



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acooks

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Great information. Thank you so much. I think this is my new favorite site. Be well
 

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