Mason jar help please!

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carizzled

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Im pretty new to this, so any tips/tricks would be awesome and very much appreciated. Ive only been collecting mason jars for about the last year.

Picture included for reference. Any idea around what date the jar to the right is from? From what I can find from the logo, its about 1896-1910 because of the 3rd "L" in the logo. Any other ways to determine a more accurate date? (I dont know how accurate those dates are- that is from a chart I found online)
Also, to note that is the only jar I have that is that shape. Anything specific about that shape of jar that is useful to know?
It also has a number 13 on the bottom. Now while I know this doesnt really mean anything, I have heard and read thru my research that jars with 13 on the bottom are thought to be more "rare" because during the prohibition they would break the 13 jars due to superstition. But, if this is the truth, were there only SPECIFIC types of jars this was done to?
Thanks in advanced for the help! Much appreciated!!
 

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jarsnstuff

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First of all, I'm attaching a Ball logo chart. I don't know which one you found online, but this one is the best IMHO. Aside from the chart, about the only other thing you could determine is which machine it was made on. Ball was one of the first companies to go to glass blowing machines in the late 1800's. You'll have to find someone who is more of a Ball expert than I to get much more detail on that. About all I know is that the Owens machine leaves a "sloppy" circular scar on the base. The Bingham machine was also one of the earlier ones they used. I think Bingham came first, but don't hold me to that - like I said, there are others who know more.

You are correct that the number on the bottom is simply a mold number and there is very little truth to the story about moonshiners & housewives breaking them because they were superstitious. There may have been a few, but there sure are a lot of #13's that didn't get broken! However, when you're looking to sell - they will always bring a better price.
 

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carizzled

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Thank you for your comment, that chart is definitely more detailed than the ones I was looking at. Do you know of anywhere else/other resources for me to get more general knowledge of mason jars? I only collect them for my own personal use, Id never sell them especially if I came across something good lol! I plan to use them for projects and things like that.

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Wildcat wrangler

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First of all, I'm attaching a Ball logo chart. I don't know which one you found online, but this one is the best IMHO. Aside from the chart, about the only other thing you could determine is which machine it was made on. Ball was one of the first companies to go to glass blowing machines in the late 1800's. You'll have to find someone who is more of a Ball expert than I to get much more detail on that. About all I know is that the Owens machine leaves a "sloppy" circular scar on the base. The Bingham machine was also one of the earlier ones they used. I think Bingham came first, but don't hold me to that - like I said, there are others who know more.

You are correct that the number on the bottom is simply a mold number and there is very little truth to the story about moonshiners & housewives breaking them because they were superstitious. There may have been a few, but there sure are a lot of #13's that didn't get broken! However, when you're looking to sell - they will always bring a better price.

Excellent chart and info too! I’ve done lots of research on it all this last year after deciding my exotic cats in my cattery were determined to see what I had displayed above the plant shelves. They broke a couple nice ones that I collected 20 years ago. You will be shocked when you decide to sell them! It’s been a cool investment. I sold 1 half gallon old ball jar with the word “drey” so clear but scrapped off with a shovel, it looked like! I love the old stories too. Fun stuff! Kat >^..^<


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jarsnstuff

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Thank you for your comment, that chart is definitely more detailed than the ones I was looking at. Do you know of anywhere else/other resources for me to get more general knowledge of mason jars? I only collect them for my own personal use, Id never sell them especially if I came across something good lol! I plan to use them for projects and things like that.

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The Redbook is the most widely used reference for fruit jar collectors. Probably the best place to start

 

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