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Anyone know is this is worth anything?

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
2,882
113
New Jersey
I’m new, very new. I’ve only been learning about bottles for less then 2 months and I’m trying to learn everything I can but I’m starting from scratch. I’m trying to keep up.
Don't get overwhelmed. So many categories to collect. I like local bottles myself. Meds, milks, sodas and beers mostly. I do dig and find most myself which helps. I know you want to do well, we are here for you to answer any authenticity questions.
ROBBYBOBBY64
 

willong

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2009
256
43
Port Angeles, WA
I just checked out the site and there is so much there, it’s so intriguing to me. Thank you!
You're quite welcome! I'm glad you found the information worthwhile.

Do you mind if I ask how you got interested in bottles?

Personally, I've always been interested in times that preceded me; perhaps the result of how much I enjoyed my Dad's recollections of his childhood on a small Pennsylvania farm during the Great Depression. I was always intrigued by a story he told me of an old country store in the woods near the farm, boarded up but with some views into the interior. Dad said it appeared to have simply been locked up and abandoned with all inventory still in place. I can't remember any of the other details, but I specifically recall him mentioning broad axes (used for hand hewing logs into squared timbers) comprising part of the stock.

I could never resist prowling through the contents when, while hunting quail and rabbits, we'd encounter an old dumpsite in some gully. I remember a discarded steamer trunk that was full of books with copyright and printing dates in the 1890's. Years later, I stumbled upon my own first truly antique bottle while returning to camp from a hard and unseasonably hot day of deer hunting near the old eastern Washington mining town of Loomis. The bottle was simply lying in the sparse dry grass of the flat between our campsite in riparian trees and the steep slope I'd climbed that morning. I'd heard from a college pal who'd gathered bottles in Livengood, AK and was packing them to ship to his sister in the Midwest--I was attending the University of Alaska in Fairbanks at the time--that antique bottles were valuable. When I stumbled upon that turn-mold whiskey it occurred to me: "Hey, Paul said these are valuable. This would be another interesting thing to do outdoors and maybe pick up a little cash." As mentioned earlier today, I've never sold a bottle--I got hooked on them instead!

1613610150141.jpeg


Sorry for the poor quality photo. I don't have space or time to set up a lightbox right now. Moreover, it is nearly dusk. I just grabbed my "first ever" and snapped photo to illustrate what I was talking about. I've kept that bottle for more than 50 years now, even though it is a common slick variety of minimal monetary value.
 

willong

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2009
256
43
Port Angeles, WA
Corrine,

I just reviewed the thread to ensure that I wasn't duplicating someone else's effort.

This might seem a bit overwhelming at first, but I doubt that there is a better comprehensive resource on the antique bottle topic: https://sha.org/bottle/

The website was crafted by an archeologist working for the Bureau of Land Management to aid others working in the field interpret and age the historical sites they study. It covers pretty much the full spectrum of historical bottles found or likely to be found at North American sites. Just summarizing what is there would take too much time to convey in this brief posting. However, the two pertinent goals of the website are stated thusly:

1. What is the age of the bottle?
(i.e., likely date range of manufacturing)
2. What type of bottle is it?
(i.e., likely use or function - typing/typology)

1613650955687.png
 
Last edited:

Corrine

Active Member
Feb 11, 2021
25
3
You're quite welcome! I'm glad you found the information worthwhile.

Do you mind if I ask how you got interested in bottles?

Personally, I've always been interested in times that preceded me; perhaps the result of how much I enjoyed my Dad's recollections of his childhood on a small Pennsylvania farm during the Great Depression. I was always intrigued by a story he told me of an old country store in the woods near the farm, boarded up but with some views into the interior. Dad said it appeared to have simply been locked up and abandoned with all inventory still in place. I can't remember any of the other details, but I specifically recall him mentioning broad axes (used for hand hewing logs into squared timbers) comprising part of the stock.

I could never resist prowling through the contents when, while hunting quail and rabbits, we'd encounter an old dumpsite in some gully. I remember a discarded steamer trunk that was full of books with copyright and printing dates in the 1890's. Years later, I stumbled upon my own first truly antique bottle while returning to camp from a hard and unseasonably hot day of deer hunting near the old eastern Washington mining town of Loomis. The bottle was simply lying in the sparse dry grass of the flat between our campsite in riparian trees and the steep slope I'd climbed that morning. I'd heard from a college pal who'd gathered bottles in Livengood, AK and was packing them to ship to his sister in the Midwest--I was attending the University of Alaska in Fairbanks at the time--that antique bottles were valuable. When I stumbled upon that turn-mold whiskey it occurred to me: "Hey, Paul said these are valuable. This would be another interesting thing to do outdoors and maybe pick up a little cash." As mentioned earlier today, I've never sold a bottle--I got hooked on them instead!

View attachment 219386

Sorry for the poor quality photo. I don't have space or time to set up a lightbox right now. Moreover, it is nearly dusk. I just grabbed my "first ever" and snapped photo to illustrate what I was talking about. I've kept that bottle for more than 50 years now, even though it is a common slick variety of minimal monetary value.
Hi!
I am so sorry for my delayed response to you, somehow I need to set up notifications when people respond to me! Anyway, I love you a question and your interest! Here goes:

No, I don’t mind if you ask how I got interested in bottles at all! It was an accidental discovery actually. I am social worker of 23 years and through the height of the pandemic when Wayne County, Michigan got hit hard with COVID I was working in the psychiatric ER at a Detroit Level I trauma hospital (Detroit Receiving Hospital, if anyone is familiar with Michigan). My daughters’s school system pulled the plug on in person learning, as most school districts did in Michigan so I had to resign from my job to stay home with her because she is in elementary and can’t stay home by herself. Our state was in lockdown for a while and we were quarantined – for the first time in my life since I was 15 years old I had no job and I had no idea what to do with myself. I felt so useless! I picked up a gardening hobby and I loved it, I was addicted. Then I got into the idea of propagating flowers in beautiful glass bottles that I would just find here and there on Ebay and other sites, you know nothing special just a place to propagate my flowers in water. I soon found out that the bottles were expensive and a lot of them were labeled “vintage style”. I had never considered collecting bottles before, but the fact that they were labeled “vintage style” made me Wonder how much actual “vintage bottles” are. So I started looking and as a novice, I’m starting at the bottom – you know, with common somewhat inexpensive bottles and I found out straight away that it is actually less expensive to find real vintage bottles then it is to find bottles that are made to look like vintage bottles. Isn’t that crazy? Plus, vintage bottles are so much more beautiful!! So that’s what got me interested and now I’m hooked!

You seem like a writer, Your words seem to flow effortlessly from thoughts to paper, I love that. The way you described your childhood and getting to listen to your dad’s stories stories is invaluable. When I was reading what you wrote I felt a twinge of jealousy that you got to be exposed to such priceless stories. Especially the great depression, I love history so much! So so much! My dream has always been to find some unknown dumpsite somewhere like you did and find all sorts of priceless artifacts. What a beautiful bottle you found, and I can imagine the excitement you felt when you just stumbled onto it. And the books you found too, what a find! You wrote that your bottle is over 50 years old but it looks so beautiful and pristine. What a great memory that is – I hope you have it displayed somewhere out in the open so you can see it frequently and your mind instantly floods with happy memories.

Like you did, I got hooked instantly as well. I love the feeling of having a connection with history, even if it is only a glass bottle or other artifact. History can’t be forgotten and Innoway I feel like I’m showing respect to the people who came before us and worked so hard. Even now though I’m still at the lowest level and buying inexpensive bottles, they are still just so gorgeous. I can’t afford truly expensive bottles and I doubt I ever will be able to but just owning restore store bottles makes me feel good inside. If that makes any sense? And I love learning too so I’m hoping to learn more, it looks like I will have the time and my daughters school district is not going back to in person learning anytime soon.

Thank you for taking the time to care and ask me questions to get to know me. I like that.

I know I will run across you soon on this forum! Until then,
much respect and peace to you.
Corrine
 

Corrine

Active Member
Feb 11, 2021
25
3
Corrine,

I just reviewed the thread to ensure that I wasn't duplicating someone else's effort.

This might seem a bit overwhelming at first, but I doubt that there is a better comprehensive resource on the antique bottle topic: https://sha.org/bottle/

The website was crafted by an archeologist working for the Bureau of Land Management to aid others working in the field interpret and age the historical sites they study. It covers pretty much the full spectrum of historical bottles found or likely to be found at North American sites. Just summarizing what is there would take too much time to convey in this brief posting. However, the two pertinent goals of the website are stated thusly:

1. What is the age of the bottle?
(i.e., likely date range of manufacturing)
2. What type of bottle is it?
(i.e., likely use or function - typing/typology)

View attachment 219407
Thank you! You are always so helpful!
Corrine
 

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