Awesome Railroad finds!

Welcome to our Antique Bottle community

Be a part of something great, join today!

Screwtop

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2018
Messages
784
Reaction score
457
Points
63
Location
Carter County Kentucky
DSC_0001.jpg


Today I hunted for several hours along an old abandoned railroad line in Kentucky. This particular stretch of railroad was in use from the 1870s, through the 1940s when coal stopped coming out of that particular area. As I was walking along the overgrown mess that is the area now, I was picking up plenty of 1930s Hemingray insulators, but these three were the ones that took the cake.


DSC_0002.jpg


I don't know anything about CD numbers, or how old they are, but they are not from the 1930s! The one on the left is marked Hemingray Pat. May 2nd 1893, with all drip points intact, the aqua Brookfield Beehive (I've always wanted one!) is marked Brookfield / New York, and the other one is marked W. Brookfield / New York.

I was finding a mix of household and telephone line insulators as well, but they were broken.


DSC_0006.jpg



The beer bottle is a West Virginia Brewing Co. bottle from Huntington W.Va, a nearby town. The druggist bottle came from Cincinnati. Weird how that ended up all the way out here! The beer bottle is a BIM, So 1900-1905 era. The druggist is from the 1890s.
 

BillinMo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2010
Messages
752
Reaction score
78
Points
28
Location
Missouri
Nice finds. The H.G. is probably late 1890s-1910 or so, and the same for the W. Brookfield signal. The beehive is a hair later, probably 1903-1910.
 

willong

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
1,023
Reaction score
997
Points
113
Location
Port Angeles, WA
Searching along an abandoned and overgrown railroad line that operated from the 1870's sounds like a dream day to me! Virtually nothing like that out here in western WA where the majority of our rail lines date 1890's or later.

Two advantages to western Washington woods though: no venomous snakes, and I have never picked up a single tick in wading through our underbrush. Some Salal stands (https://green2.kingcounty.gov/gonative/Plant.aspx?Act=view&PlantID=33) can actually grow over head height despite what plant guides say; and it can be mightily frustrating to tunnel one's way through such jungles. In such encounters it is nice to not be also encumbered by thoughts what what might be slithering around one's feet or latching onto one's clothing!

If you find cuts and fills along the way, be sure to check the fill embankments for items discarded by the original workers as well as toss out the windows by train crew and passengers. A potato rake or small cultivator, even a pitchfork, is a good tool for raking and probing through the forest detritus. What would be really great is to encounter the crunchy feel and sound of crumbling tin cans with a trace of solder sealing a small hole in the center of the lid, a great indicator that you've located a vintage dumpsite. Ravines and gullie, as well as creek banks, were always popular disposal terrain.

Hope you find more so we can all enjoy the adventure vicariously!
 

dario

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
51
Reaction score
65
Points
18
Location
Dario the Insulator guy
View attachment 227161

Today I hunted for several hours along an old abandoned railroad line in Kentucky. This particular stretch of railroad was in use from the 1870s, through the 1940s when coal stopped coming out of that particular area. As I was walking along the overgrown mess that is the area now, I was picking up plenty of 1930s Hemingray insulators, but these three were the ones that took the cake.


View attachment 227162

I don't know anything about CD numbers, or how old they are, but they are not from the 1930s! The one on the left is marked Hemingray Pat. May 2nd 1893, with all drip points intact, the aqua Brookfield Beehive (I've always wanted one!) is marked Brookfield / New York, and the other one is marked W. Brookfield / New York.

I was finding a mix of household and telephone line insulators as well, but they were broken.


View attachment 227163


The beer bottle is a West Virginia Brewing Co. bottle from Huntington W.Va, a nearby town. The druggist bottle came from Cincinnati. Weird how that ended up all the way out here! The beer bottle is a BIM, So 1900-1905 era. The druggist is from the 1890s.
You have a CD 145 BROOKFIELD, a CD 162 HEMINGRAY, and a CD 133 BROOKFIELD. The May 2nd 1893 patent on the Hemingray is for the drip points. The CD 133 is most likely the oldest of the 3 insulators. They are all about 100 years old or a bit more.
 

margclearlake

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2012
Messages
110
Reaction score
26
Points
28
I was walking the Santa Fe line near, well my property near Santa Fe. found a whole bunch of Thomas Edison Battery Oils. really cool bottles with his signature done in cursive. they were so small couldnt figure out the use. seems battery oil was put over the water in the batteries to help with evaporation. seems the workers just threw them. I donated them to a railroad museum that surprisingly did not have any.

Also found a whole bunch of the china that they used on the train. red and white, with aztecy birds and such, from Mimbreno Syracuse factory. I can just imagine the spoiled jerks throwing it off the train, there was so much of it, sherds. pretty though. donated that too.
 

Bohdan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2019
Messages
282
Reaction score
104
Points
43
Location
Prairies of Canada
View attachment 227161

Today I hunted for several hours along an old abandoned railroad line in Kentucky. This particular stretch of railroad was in use from the 1870s, through the 1940s when coal stopped coming out of that particular area. As I was walking along the overgrown mess that is the area now, I was picking up plenty of 1930s Hemingray insulators, but these three were the ones that took the cake.


View attachment 227162

I don't know anything about CD numbers, or how old they are, but they are not from the 1930s! The one on the left is marked Hemingray Pat. May 2nd 1893, with all drip points intact, the aqua Brookfield Beehive (I've always wanted one!) is marked Brookfield / New York, and the other one is marked W. Brookfield / New York.

I was finding a mix of household and telephone line insulators as well, but they were broken.


View attachment 227163


The beer bottle is a West Virginia Brewing Co. bottle from Huntington W.Va, a nearby town. The druggist bottle came from Cincinnati. Weird how that ended up all the way out here! The beer bottle is a BIM, So 1900-1905 era. The druggist is from the 1890s.

Wash the bottle before you post it!
Common sense.
Common courtesy.
 

Latest posts

Members online

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
83,353
Messages
743,776
Members
24,373
Latest member
Johnny Rocky
Top