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hemihampton

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hmmm.
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willong

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Now see whatcha did, here…. You have me thinking about walking the rails, here- it’s flat freakin hot here, always in the summer, but this is worse-Redding heat on Steroids! Thinking the lake that’s now a creek would be a good call. Even that’s too far down for crystal hunting or rock climbing-Plus we do have a lot of the snakes with the noisy tails, with a huge spider on every rock, is what I saw, Sunday. I got over the fear of snakes, as much time as I spend climbing out there- I just watch everything so close because 1 wrong move and it’s 129’ of a Very bad fall, straight down with occasional giant boulders, before you hit the lake! But those big
a$$ed spiders? Those freak me, for real! I think maybe we have the same trax running thru here and up the coast, pretty much, to Alaska. But to me, I would be really happy finding 1890’ trash, too!


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I don't like to admit it. However, since I had no say in the matter as a child, I'll 'fess to growing up in California. I loved hunting quail and rabbits with my father and his friends there. Even before I got my first shotgun at age nine, I would go along on the trips to act as a birddog and retriever. I cringe today, thinking of some of the brush tunnels I would crawl through! On one trip, when I too was hunting, I picked 21 ticks off my body, one of which had already embedded.

Being away from that hot country more than five decades, I've grown considerably more tolerant of both snakes and spiders. Spiders generally only bother me now in Fall, when it sometimes seems one cannot take more than half-a-dozen steps in the woods without having to push through another clinging web, often with a fearsome looking spider clinging near its center, stretched across the path.

I actually found myself concerned for the survival of a little garter snake in the backyard over the past Winter when I did not see it again this Spring. It has unusually rich, red stripes, and is thus distinguishable from others of its clan. Last year, it appeared repeatedly in a bit of weeds growing where I have some fence panels stacked. I finally spotted it again about two weeks ago, somewhat removed from that site. I was actually relieved to see the little critter! That said, I still sometimes jump back if a snake slithering near my feet catches me by surprise. I see no reason to fret over, or try to shed, ingrained survival habits. I inherited some acreage in northeastern WA, and I recently bought acreage in Montana, east of Missoula. Rattlesnakes are possible in both locations. Unfortunately, the dreaded ticks are more than possible!

Good luck with your low-water explorations. I can't think of anything else that might put a positive spin on extended drought. I almost drowned in Lake Isabella when I was eight years old. I heard back then that the impoundment had flooded a gold rush-era town. I only learned in recent years that the tale was true when I saw an article about foundations of the town, which dated from the mid-nineteenth century, becoming exposed in mudflats far from the regular shoreline due to extended drought.

Falls are probably among the biggest outdoor killers, maybe followed by heat stroke in your region and hypothermia where I live.

Take care!
 

Wildcat Wrangling Kat

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I don't like to admit it. However, since I had no say in the matter as a child, I'll 'fess to growing up in California. I loved hunting quail and rabbits with my father and his friends there. Even before I got my first shotgun at age nine, I would go along on the trips to act as a birddog and retriever. I cringe today, thinking of some of the brush tunnels I would crawl through! On one trip, when I too was hunting, I picked 21 ticks off my body, one of which had already embedded.

Being away from that hot country more than five decades, I've grown considerably more tolerant of both snakes and spiders. Spiders generally only bother me now in Fall, when it sometimes seems one cannot take more than half-a-dozen steps in the woods without having to push through another clinging web, often with a fearsome looking spider clinging near its center, stretched across the path.

I actually found myself concerned for the survival of a little garter snake in the backyard over the past Winter when I did not see it again this Spring. It has unusually rich, red stripes, and is thus distinguishable from others of its clan. Last year, it appeared repeatedly in a bit of weeds growing where I have some fence panels stacked. I finally spotted it again about two weeks ago, somewhat removed from that site. I was actually relieved to see the little critter! That said, I still sometimes jump back if a snake slithering near my feet catches me by surprise. I see no reason to fret over, or try to shed, ingrained survival habits. I inherited some acreage in northeastern WA, and I recently bought acreage in Montana, east of Missoula. Rattlesnakes are possible in both locations. Unfortunately, the dreaded ticks are more than possible!

Good luck with your low-water explorations. I can't think of anything else that might put a positive spin on extended drought. I almost drowned in Lake Isabella when I was eight years old. I heard back then that the impoundment had flooded a gold rush-era town. I only learned in recent years that the tale was true when I saw an article about foundations of the town, which dated from the mid-nineteenth century, becoming exposed in mudflats far from the regular shoreline due to extended drought.

Falls are probably among the biggest outdoor killers, maybe followed by heat stroke in your region and hypothermia where I live.

Take care!

First of all, that’s so beautifully written. You moved from 1 extreme to the other, it sounds like! Shock therapy. Do u prefer Washington or Montana best? All I know is I am thinking more and more about packing up all the cats and my stuff and moving from my hometown where my dad grew up, and grandpa was an engineer on the dam even. Deep roots and property & home to sell I would need the right set up for 14 cats plus litters of kittens- most inside unless they are hopeless pissers! And am outside set up for those ones. But I could set up elsewhere. I would have to find a state where my cats - many 75% African serval, are legal. A state where I could own a full blooded serval would be icing on the cake…. So more research needed. Some place where the lakes not evaporated and there is water to float such a boat on! Lol! Where in Cali did u live? Or did I ask u that before and forget? Well it’s not the place that it was growing up, for sure. And the mountain my dad gave me will end up burning, I would betcha! For 3 years now there are fires that burn right up to it and then get put out. (Whew!) the last one burned the town called Ono, nearest town it was, on its March out to the creek property. Then living in Redding forever, well the heat is just a touch less than Death Valley! It was a cool 115-117 all last week. I noticed it was 99 degrees at midnight so it does cool off at night! (Practically parka weather!) But that’s getting old, the older I get. Snakes are not too freaky to me but they are always too close like crawling over my foot. I picked 1 up and played with it for 30 minutes when I was 6, so that’s a life long deal, I guess. But spiders- well they have a lot of legs and are fast and creep to places and hide and run after me,a lot- truth be known, there is not much that scares the hell out of me, but spiders and dentists made that list! (Said the girl who chose to get all her teeth capped really, really perfect. 11 crowns 2 days ago and all the bottom teeth plus 2 more on The top, aug. 5…Still fear dentists!) I probably won’t adjust to the spider thing any time soon. Have a great weekend! Kat


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Wildcat Wrangling Kat

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I don't like to admit it. However, since I had no say in the matter as a child, I'll 'fess to growing up in California. I loved hunting quail and rabbits with my father and his friends there. Even before I got my first shotgun at age nine, I would go along on the trips to act as a birddog and retriever. I cringe today, thinking of some of the brush tunnels I would crawl through! On one trip, when I too was hunting, I picked 21 ticks off my body, one of which had already embedded.

Being away from that hot country more than five decades, I've grown considerably more tolerant of both snakes and spiders. Spiders generally only bother me now in Fall, when it sometimes seems one cannot take more than half-a-dozen steps in the woods without having to push through another clinging web, often with a fearsome looking spider clinging near its center, stretched across the path.

I actually found myself concerned for the survival of a little garter snake in the backyard over the past Winter when I did not see it again this Spring. It has unusually rich, red stripes, and is thus distinguishable from others of its clan. Last year, it appeared repeatedly in a bit of weeds growing where I have some fence panels stacked. I finally spotted it again about two weeks ago, somewhat removed from that site. I was actually relieved to see the little critter! That said, I still sometimes jump back if a snake slithering near my feet catches me by surprise. I see no reason to fret over, or try to shed, ingrained survival habits. I inherited some acreage in northeastern WA, and I recently bought acreage in Montana, east of Missoula. Rattlesnakes are possible in both locations. Unfortunately, the dreaded ticks are more than possible!

Good luck with your low-water explorations. I can't think of anything else that might put a positive spin on extended drought. I almost drowned in Lake Isabella when I was eight years old. I heard back then that the impoundment had flooded a gold rush-era town. I only learned in recent years that the tale was true when I saw an article about foundations of the town, which dated from the mid-nineteenth century, becoming exposed in mudflats far from the regular shoreline due to extended drought.

Falls are probably among the biggest outdoor killers, maybe followed by heat stroke in your region and hypothermia where I live.

Take care!

First of all, that’s so beautifully written. You moved from 1 extreme to the other, it sounds like! Shock therapy. Do u prefer Washington or Montana best? All I know is I am thinking more and more about packing up all the cats and my stuff and moving from my hometown where my dad grew up, and grandpa was an engineer on the dam even. Deep roots and property & home to sell I would need the right set up for 14 cats plus litters of kittens- most inside unless they are hopeless pissers! And am outside set up for those ones. But I could set up elsewhere. I would have to find a state where my cats - many 75% African serval, are legal. A state where I could own a full blooded serval would be icing on the cake…. So more research needed. Some place where the lakes not evaporated and there is water to float such a boat on! Lol! Where in Cali did u live? Or did I ask u that before and forget? Well it’s not the place that it was growing up, for sure. And the mountain my dad gave me will end up burning, I would betcha! For 3 years now there are fires that burn right up to it and then get put out. (Whew!) the last one burned the town called Ono, nearest town it was, on its March out to the creek property. Then living in Redding forever, well the heat is just a touch less than Death Valley! It was a cool 115-117 all last week. I noticed it was 99 degrees at midnight so it does cool off at night! (Practically parka weather!) But that’s getting old, the older I get. Snakes are not too freaky to me but they are always too close like crawling over my foot. I picked 1 up and played with it for 30 minutes when I was 6, so that’s a life long deal, I guess. But spiders- well they have a lot of legs and are fast and creep to places and hide and run after me,a lot- truth be known, there is not much that scares the hell out of me, but spiders and dentists made that list! (Said the girl who chose to get all her teeth capped really, really perfect. 11 crowns 2 days ago and all the bottom teeth plus 2 more on The top, aug. 5…Still fear dentists!) I probably won’t adjust to the spider thing any time soon. Have a great weekend! Kat


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