dremel tool?

psmason73

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once you have ground out a bruise with the dremel, any one have any tips on how to buff out the cloudy spot left?what kind of buffing head or compound?
 

suzanne

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Is it valuable? It is a good to learn how to get rid of cloudiness before you attack the victim with a dremel.
 

Wangan

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I think he is talking about the cloudiness AFTER the dremels use not cloudiness in general.

I think Hextal would work.Im not sure if polyurethane would stick to glass.Maybe clear nail polish?I wouldnt grind out a bruise so I dont really know.
 

suzanne

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I know he is talking about cloudiness after not before. Cloudiness before is easy to deal with. Actually what has happened is the the glass has been roughed up by the dremel and has to be polished out. You have to buy polishing stuff and it takes patience so it is good to learn how to do this ahead of time so you can decide if a small bruise is even worth bothering with. I know what he needs to do but since he didn't ask me in particular I'm not going to bother going over it.

You see, the more you rough up an area of glass the longer it will take to smooth it so it blends into the rest of the bottle. If you tried tumbling I imagine you would end up taking out the top layer of glass; if I am wrong about this someone please correct me. If the bottle is not valuable maybe he could just toss it.
 

justanolddigger

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all well said Suzanne. The only thing I would like to add about the tumbling that seems to be misunderstood is the various compounds that clean to different degrees. A simple cleaning with aluminum oxide that I buy from the jar Doctor does not remove glass, it is simply removing stain on top of the glass, it is a cleaning compound. The different degrees of cutters can lightly grind that will not remove embossing to cutters that can remove embossing within hours. Suzanne described the reason for the dullness very well. To remove it with tumbling, you would first have to use a light cutter to polish the dremel marks left behind, and then follow with an aluminum oxide to restore the sheen. You could probably polish a small area like that by hand also with super fine sand paper, but that is not my area of expertise.
 

cowseatmaize

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Tumbling is an option but doesn't it need to be the whole thing?
I always wondered about auto rubbing compounds and a dremel. Friction heat may be an enemy there though. Maybe a lower speed drill and pad or buffing cloth on a bench grinder?
Another way would be with heat and melt it back to state.
They're both risky for the same obvious reasons.
CRRAAACCK!
 

baltbottles

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all well said Suzanne. The only thing I would like to add about the tumbling that seems to be misunderstood is the various compounds that clean to different degrees. A simple cleaning with aluminum oxide that I buy from the jar Doctor does not remove glass, it is simply removing stain on top of the glass, it is a cleaning compound. The different degrees of cutters can lightly grind that will not remove embossing to cutters that can remove embossing within hours. Suzanne described the reason for the dullness very well. To remove it with tumbling, you would first have to use a light cutter to polish the dremel marks left behind, and then follow with an aluminum oxide to restore the sheen. You could probably polish a small area like that by hand also with super fine sand paper, but that is not my area of expertise.

All tumbling weather you use a polish or a cutter removes glass. Glass is not staining its a chemical leaching of silicon from the surface of the glass the only way to fix this is to remove this surface layer and expose a new layer of glass. All tumbled bottles have had a thin layer of their surface polished away. This is why its not hard to tell a tumbled bottle from one that is attic mint.

Chris
 

Wilkie

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I tried using a dremmel on a bottle once, there was a slight crack that I couldn't see and the dremmel caused it to spread. The friction caused heat, so keep that in mind when doing that.
 

epackage

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ORIGINAL: Wilkie

I tried using a dremmel on a bottle once, there was a slight crack that I couldn't see and the dremmel caused it to spread. The friction caused heat, so keep that in mind when doing that.
Filling the bottle with water first should help wth heat..
 

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