Help identify these bottles/utility type pieces

rnagels

New Member
Hello Antique bottles community! Anyone know based on my photos if these are older bottles, who made em, use, and age. The purple one looks like it has a broken off type top but when you run your finger around it, it is super smooth.
 

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bottles_inc

Well-Known Member
To me these look newer, anywhere from 1940s to 2000s, but thate a total guess. Ive never seen older pontil bottles in those shapes and the colors are a little suspect but I'm no expert, they could easily be the real deal. I'm sure someone else will have some input
 

rnagels

New Member
To me these look newer, anywhere from 1940s to 2000s, but thate a total guess. Ive never seen older pontil bottles in those shapes and the colors are a little suspect but I'm no expert, they could easily be the real deal. I'm sure someone else will have some input
Thank you. Is there a way to inspect them further to get an age o them?
 

Dogo

DOGO
Wheaton Village glassblowers make (or did make) similar pieces in their demonstration shop. I don't know if the shop is still working or not, but I have a piece similar to the purple one that I bought there. Wheaton Village is in Millville, NJ, and is modeled on T C Wheaton glassworks. They had an outstanding museum, well worth the visit for anyone interested in old glass.
 

SKS.TUSC

Active Member
I always look to see where the mold lines stop at going up the bottle. If they go clear up the side of the bottle clear to the mouth or thread. They are made at a recent time period.
 

rnagels

New Member
I always look to see where the mold lines stop at going up the bottle. If they go clear up the side of the bottle clear to the mouth or thread. They are made at a recent time period.
Thanks, there are no mold lines anywhere on the bottle.
 

Mayhem

Well-Known Member
The amethyst pocket flask on the right is of the type made by Clevenger Brothers circa 1930 - 1960. Ritter-Carlton Company, Inc., of Fifth Avenue, New York, New York, published a catalog in 1939 showing the Clevenger glassware they were selling but never mentioned Clevenger by name. The catalog itself is titled “Authentic Reproductions of Early American Glass”. The publication went on to say that “we are proud to present this rare collection of authentic hand blown replicas of Early American glass. Some of these flasks were also sold in the Metropolitan Museum of Art gift shop and are etched "MMA" on the bottom. See attached picture of a collection of Clevenger pocket flasks. These can bring $25 to $50.

The amber yellow utility bottle on the left is an odd shape and color for an early American piece in my opinion. I have seen pieces in this color that have come out of Mexico. Not worth much unless you get two bidders who must have it.
 

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