Just beginning, want to be safe....

ChrisChambers

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Thanks for the tip, I’ve done a little research on emf and electrical fields online. There are residential power lines that go over in places. They are about 7 to 8 feet above them, I will still probably only go for ones with 1 or no lines attached.
 

BillinMo

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If you want to be safe, there are multiple things to think about. As a longtime insulator collector, I'll pass along what I've learned.
1) Stay away from anything with wires. You don't know for certain if it's active or not. A fair number of people have been killed over the years attempting to retrieve insulators, both from falls and electrocution. If you're not a qualified pole line worker, stay away from any sort of wires, even if you're not climbing the pole.
2) Get permission. These days, most railroads and utilities will press charges if you're caught trespassing. If you're caught actually messing with poles or insulators, they could add vandalism, theft, etc. Copper theft has become a big deal, so many companies are stepping up patrols and reporting.
If you truly want to gather insulators, talk to the property owners and explain what you want to do. Another alternative is to contact your local electric company and ask if they're discarding old equipment and if you can look through their trash.
Best of luck to you. Please be safe and don't risk your life.
 

Brittany Cogar

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In my years of pulling insulators off standing and fallen poles I have never found steel wires. All have been copper.

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Since we're talking about insulators, know anything about this? I'm honestly not even sure if it's glass or ceramic. It screws apart. I'm pretty new to this, and I haven't done a ton of research, however my attempt didn't yield anything ‍♀️
 

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ChrisChambers

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If you want to be safe, there are multiple things to think about. As a longtime insulator collector, I'll pass along what I've learned.
1) Stay away from anything with wires. You don't know for certain if it's active or not. A fair number of people have been killed over the years attempting to retrieve insulators, both from falls and electrocution. If you're not a qualified pole line worker, stay away from any sort of wires, even if you're not climbing the pole.
2) Get permission. These days, most railroads and utilities will press charges if you're caught trespassing. If you're caught actually messing with poles or insulators, they could add vandalism, theft, etc. Copper theft has become a big deal, so many companies are stepping up patrols and reporting.
If you truly want to gather insulators, talk to the property owners and explain what you want to do. Another alternative is to contact your local electric company and ask if they're discarding old equipment and if you can look through their trash.
Best of luck to you. Please be safe and don't risk your life.
Okay thanks, I really appreciate the advice. I will take everything you’ve said into consideration.
 

Fenndango

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There's an insulator named after you the Chambers candlestick. There might be 3 different Chamber CDs? I forget
 

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