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Properties and Principles of Glass

Fenndango

Well-Known Member
Jan 10, 2021
113
28
Can anyone tell me if glass can be melted and poured into a large quantity say like a 10ft^3 area without severe fracturing or anything which may weaken the overall structural integrity. Also how strong would that block of glass be? Could you crash a car into it at any certain speed without severe damage.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
3,467
113
New Jersey
Can anyone tell me if glass can be melted and poured into a large quantity say like a 10ft^3 area without severe fracturing or anything which may weaken the overall structural integrity. Also how strong would that block of glass be? Could you crash a car into it at any certain speed without severe damage.
283.1684 litres of glass. That is a large amount. You gonna float it on tin? Corning glass made the biggest lenses around. The annealing process is what takes the longest time. I am sure with the right facility anything is possible. I got to ask...why?
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

Fenndango

Well-Known Member
Jan 10, 2021
113
28
The annealing can be avoided fairly easily right? Pour the glass into the mold inside an oven then cool it very slowly?

I saw Corning did that. I read an art sculpture was made of glass about those dimensions which is the largest ever but turned up no info on it.

It's top secret. I just really like glass
 

embe

Well-Known Member
Jul 14, 2019
463
63
What a strange question, lol. Depends on the type of glass, raw materials, getting the COE correct, annealing, etc. etc. Thermal shock from the temperature of the mold etc. etc.

Cubic feet is volume (^3), area is square feet (^2).

Post a pic when you're done!
 

Fenndango

Well-Known Member
Jan 10, 2021
113
28
The telescope lenses at Corning were probably convex or concave or whatever its called. I imagine those would need to be absolutely flawless in every way which may be tougher than pouring a solid block.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
3,467
113
New Jersey
The annealing can be avoided fairly easily right? Pour the glass into the mold inside an oven then cool it very slowly?

I saw Corning did that. I read an art sculpture was made of glass about those dimensions which is the largest ever but turned up no info on it.

It's top secret. I just really like glass
A large amount depending on the glass can take months to annealing properly. My knowledge of glass manufacturing is limited. You should ask a professional at Corning glass. It is a dangerous thing you are talking about doing and I am not really qualified to safely answer. I do believe all glass regardless needs to be annealed.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
3,467
113
New Jersey
The annealing can be avoided fairly easily right? Pour the glass into the mold inside an oven then cool it very slowly?

I saw Corning did that. I read an art sculpture was made of glass about those dimensions which is the largest ever but turned up no info on it.

It's top secret. I just really like glass
There is the one way which is to pour molten glass into the mold or you could take method two called frit casting which is to take chips of glass (frit) and fill the mold them heat up until molten. Might be the easier way to do in the oven. Good luck with whatever your up to.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

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