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Reworked molds and name changes on jars.

Wildcat wrangler

Well-Known Member
Mar 14, 2021
112
43
I am trying to get more info on the practice of reworking old molds when companies were purchased by the Ball company. I have heard “Rall” was bought out and name changed. I own a half gallon one that’s so ruff- where you can read Drey under Ball, with big scrape marks and orange peel glass above. Does anyone have more info on other name do-overs, and maybe point me to more info? Was this a common practice with other companies? Did it extend to regular bottles?
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CanadianBottles

Well-Known Member
May 24, 2014
3,211
113
I don't have any information on the practice per se, but I do know of another example. The Coronet fruit jar from British Columbia is a Crown jar mold with the name changed and half of the crown logo erased.

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It was done for other types of bottles as well, but I'm not sure what sort of circumstances would lead to it being done. It's not something that I come across that frequently.
 

nhpharm

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2007
2,451
113
Molds were expensive so it was common practice to modify a mold when (1) the original mold had an error like a misspelling, backwards letter, etc. (2) when the company was acquired by another company (like the Ball/Drey situation), (3) when a partner left or was added to a company, (4) when government regulations forced rewording (such as changing cure to remedy), or (5) when a company wanted to change their dated bottle to another year (typically seen on blob beers).
 
Last edited:

Nickolas_

Member
Sep 14, 2016
11
3
I am trying to get more info on the practice of reworking old molds when companies were purchased by the Ball company. I have heard “Rall” was bought out and name changed. I own a half gallon one that’s so ruff- where you can read Drey under Ball, with big scrape marks and orange peel glass above. Does anyone have more info on other name do-overs, and maybe point me to more info? Was this a common practice with other companies? Did it extend to regular bottles? View attachment 226240View attachment 226241View attachment 226242View attachment 226243View attachment 226244
Ball was very well known to use their moulds and alter them until they plum wore out. You will find many altered mould jars that Ball reworked from the purchase of other glass companies. Ball purchased quite a few other glass companies and altered their moulds to have their name on them. Some are quite crude and others are done very well.
Port glass works, Schram or Drey, Root are a few that you will run across. Ive owned a lot of Ball jars over the years ivebeen collecting them for 40 years easily. I sold off a lot of my better jars in 08-10 when i lost my job and went out on disability. I still have quite a few jars though and gifted jars from other collectors no longer with us. Ball jars are fun to collect for the many variants one may find...

Sent from my SM-A102U using Tapatalk
 

Wildcat wrangler

Well-Known Member
Mar 14, 2021
112
43
Thank you! I really love the history and the stories with their twists and turns- really, you would be hard pressed to make up better stories than some of these. I didn’t realize just how many companies, over the years, have similar really fascinating stories about their companies. Horlicks come to mind...

But what do you tell people when your sitting there with a jar all scraped up and poorly done, and they are running this on you:

“I don't see how this is possible for Drey to be peened out under Ball (3L). The Ball 3L without Mason jars were produced 1896-1910. Ball 3L (with Mason) were made 1900-1910. Ball acquired Schram (the maker of Drey) in 1925. The Ball 3L molds belonged to Ball and never Schram.”

And:

“this is not a reworked drey mold ball discontinued 3L script in 1910 drey weren't produced til about 1915 an ball didn't purchase the company til 1925”

Here’s what I said:

Drey was made by Schram Automatic Sealer Company, founded in 1904.
Production of Drey jars started in 1917. Drey was bought by Ball in 1925. Ball continued to make them for 13 years. While every other jar company marked prices way down during the Great Depression, Ball kept their prices high to give their line a reputation for quality. They sold the Drey stuff as their discount line so they could have it both ways. This puts the production of Drey jars between 1917 and 1938. If you look closely you can see the words "EVER SEAL" under the word "Drey". Since the words are not centered I'm taking this to mean this jar was made by Schram instead of by Ball. And they did the triple loop L on old stock that was there. Things were tight- the depression was on, so in the interest of saving some bux, the molds were retooled.
Kat

So people really take their idea of what the history was, personally, and are very closed minded to any variation from that. Meanwhile I am sitting here with this freaky jar... I don’t know if they think I jacked up this jar, myself, or what! Lol! Does anyone have a thought as to what happened on the finish of my jar? Just a inexperienced mold reworked, learning? The scrape marks are really strange, and then the orange peel glass above that...
 

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