Broken bottles worth keeping, selling, donating, chucking

Welcome to our Antique Bottle community

Be a part of something great, join today!

UnderMiner

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2020
Messages
249
Reaction score
563
Points
93
H

What makes you think human beings have that long?

Because humans have survived ice ages, the black death, volcanoes, asteroid impacts, and constant devastating wars for the past several hundred thousand years. Events that have wiped out entire species - mammoths, saber toothed tigers, dire wolves, cave bears, and other wild beasts. We are like roaches. People still live in caves, on islands, atop mountains, in the most inhospitable lands imaginable (Siberia for example), and only a handful (of the several billion of us) need live to continue the population. Near-total human extinction events have actually happened many many times.
 

willong

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
869
Reaction score
855
Points
93
Location
Port Angeles, WA
Because humans have survived ice ages, the black death, volcanoes, asteroid impacts, and constant devastating wars for the past several hundred thousand years. Events that have wiped out entire species - mammoths, saber toothed tigers, dire wolves, cave bears, and other wild beasts. We are like roaches. People still live in caves, on islands, atop mountains, in the most inhospitable lands imaginable (Siberia for example), and only a handful (of the several billion of us) need live to continue the population. Near-total human extinction events have actually happened many many times.
Your comment reminds me of a science fiction story from the 1950's. Given your argument, I'm pretty sure that you would enjoy reading "Big Ancestor" by F. L. Wallace. The full November, 1954, issue of GALAXY magazine in which it originally appeared can be freely downloaded (in several file formats including Kindle) at the Internet Archive. https://archive.org/details/Galaxy_v09n02_1954-11

Like much of the speculative fiction of the age, Big Ancestor features a great ironic revelation. ('nuff said?)


WL
 

DavidW

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2014
Messages
236
Reaction score
174
Points
43
Location
Southern Indiana
If you like em', keep em' I guess?

Personally, I could never understand keeping broken bottles/jars..

Whatever makes you happy though.

I can certainly understand keeping broken / damaged bottles. In some cases, not all. Anyone who is interested in serious research about specific glass companies/factories and their output can understand this (the average run-of-the-mill collector may not).

Some of the most important and insightful glass research was done in the early 1920s by Harry Hall White and others. They dug at various old glass factory location sites, and saved lots of broken glass (shards) for study. Lots of info about bottles and bottle molds used at a particular factory could be deduced from close study of the shards.

And some collectors who are into collecting a specific company's products, or a certain type of bottle (like flasks, or cathedral pickles, or early inks) might be more than happy to save shards of a scarce bottle they don't otherwise have an example of.

There are a number of "serious research" books that include broken bottles in some of the pictures shown. A couple books that come to mind are Illinois Bottles book ("Bottled in Illinois" covering 1840-1880) by Kenneth Farnsworth & John Walthall, and "Louisville Breweries" by Peter Guetig and Conrad Selle). Also several books on Druggist, pharmacy and soda bottles show pics or drawings of damaged bottles.

There are many local pharmacy bottles around the US that are known only from a partial example.

(I don't know much about British bottles, and both of those shown in the picture by the OP are from Great Britain). The one on the right is definitely a keeper.

Don't Knock broken bottles! :)
 

Newtothiss

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2021
Messages
403
Reaction score
486
Points
63
Location
WA
Nothing against those who keep em', just not for me..

If I lived in an area that was much older, or found something stupid rare, I might have different feelings.



Do you. Keep whatever you like and/or makes YOU happy!
No wrong answers..
 

JEDOSERB60

New Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2022
Messages
1
Reaction score
1
Points
3
Hello,

I moved into a new cottage and found a number of old, but broken bottles in the garage - presumably left by the previous owner. Since they look old, before I get rid of them I though i would check if they were worth something to someone. They have "Tyrer London SE" and "Cathedral Brand" written on them. Any info would be appreciated. thanks
I GET OLD BROKEN BOTTLES FROM MY COUSINS FARM AND BREAK THEM FURTHER AND TUMBLE THEM LIKE SEA GLASS SORRY FOR CAPS BAD EYESIGHT
 

hemihampton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2006
Messages
8,053
Reaction score
4,673
Points
113
Here's a Broken one I kept, one of many. I kept because only one I ever seen & only one I know of to exist. I'd like someone to show me another one. LEON.
WestBranchAmber.JPG
 

DeepSeaDan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Messages
269
Reaction score
562
Points
93
For eligible broken bottles, I prefer to make a drinking glass out of them. It preserves the embossing and makes a great conversation piece.
 

Attachments

  • Antique Glassware.jpg
    Antique Glassware.jpg
    144.9 KB · Views: 18

Latest posts

Members online

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
81,459
Messages
731,760
Members
22,102
Latest member
mikehannahjill
Top