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Len

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Urine-the official smell of a city that seldom/never really upgraded its water infrastructure. Well, hey, out of sight out of mind--until Flint, Mich. and Jackson, Mississippi. Hmmm. Oh well, C'mon Subway Series, rocket launch, and what's the hold-up on burying that royal monarch of a foreign govt.?
 

UnderMiner

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Urine-the official smell of a city that seldom/never really upgraded its water infrastructure. Well, hey, out of sight out of mind--until Flint, Mich. and Jackson, Mississippi. Hmmm. Oh well, C'mon Subway Series, rocket launch, and what's the hold-up on burying that royal monarch of a foreign govt.?
To the contrary NYC has probably the most advanced water system in the world right now. Their system of aqueducts as early as the 1870's were second only to the British Empire in surpassing the capacity of the aquaducts of the Roman Empire (who were famous for their aquaducts). Curently the New Croton aquaduct is the oldest and supplies mostly the Bronx (which is filtered at the Croton Water Filtration Plant, completed in 2014). The other aquaducts, the Delaware Aquaduct and the Catskill Aquaduct (the newest), supply the other four burros. The Kensico Dam, which is the most southern part of the Catskills system contains the most individually hand-carved stones in any structure on Earth since the Great Pyramid of Giza. And these are just a few facts of the NYC water supply that I know off the top of my head, it's a very good system.

In fact the biggest reason for why I find so many blob-top beer bottles in the grounds of New York City is because in the late 1800's with the opening of the Old Croton and then the New Croton Aquaduct, NYC had the cleanest, cheapest, and most abundant water in out of all cities in the US and breweries opened up in NYC to take advantage of this fact. All NYC beer was made with water from this system and their beer was arguably the best in the nation as a result.

So, to reiterate, the NYC water supply system is far from perfect but it is probably still among the best on Earth to this day. The water isn't sourced from contaminated lands but from very meticulously maintained watersheds kept religiously free from contamination, and since there are several systems sourcing from different locations there will always be back up systems at work if one should need to get shut down for whatever reason. So it will never be like Flint Michigan, never.
 

Len

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Okay Underminer,
I remember some of that now (Thank You early Bruce Willis movie). I realize it is not an intake problem so is it then an outflow problem affiliated with older buildings in NYC like Grand Central? .. I apologize for the continuance of any stereotyping and thank you for clearing the air with your detailed and friendly information. I stand corrected. ;)
 
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hemihampton

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Flint had access to clean water & could of had clean water & did have clean water at one time. But the Clowns running the city switched to a cheaper way of obtaining water which is when all the problems started. it all comes down to 2 things. Greed & Incompetency.
 

UnderMiner

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Flint had access to clean water & could of had clean water & did have clean water at one time. But the Clowns running the city switched to a cheaper way of obtaining water which is when all the problems started. it all comes down to 2 things. Greed & Incompetency.
Didn't Flint sell their "good water" to the Nestle corporation? I know Nestle purchased the water rights of some big city, I think it was Flint but I could be wrong. So Nestle bottled the good water and then sold it back to the population in bottles at a 10,000% profit while the relatively free Flint tap water was poisonous.
 

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Okay Underminer,
I remember some of that now (Thank You early Bruce Willis movie). I realize it is not an intake problem so is it then an outflow problem affiliated with older buildings in NYC like Grand Central? .. I apologize for the continuance of any stereotyping and thank you for clearing the air with your detailed and friendly information. I stand corrected. ;)
:D No problem. Sorry if I came off brash.

The aquaduct in Die Hard With a Vengeance is Tunnel 3 of the Catskill system, and it really is that gigantic. (They didn't actually film in the real aquaduct pipe. The truck driver explains to John McClain alot of true facts about the real system though).

The biggest problem with the NYC water supply isn't the supply part but the sewage part, which I think is what you may have been referring to.

When it rains in NYC the rainwater goes into the same sewer that the toilets and sinks drain into. The sewer's capacity is limited so if it rains too much the water will over flow the system and everything will burst out. This can flood basements of private residences, the NYC subway system, entire roads, and it will drain into the ocean. So tampons, diapers, condoms, and all sorts of other nasty things will go off into the sea. That is why the "low tide smell" of NYC smells like sewage - because it is.

The city is doing things to fix this problem though. The Newtown Creek treatment plant in Brooklyn is the largest water treatment plant in the city, and one of the largest in the nation. For some reason people actually go there for fun, I don't know why. It's open to the public apparently. There is sort of a waterfall where the cleaned water is released from the building so maybe people go to see that.
 

Len

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Nestle is buying water rights big and small all over the US. (Foreign?) In the town of Meriden, CT (approx. 80K) there were two family run water companies. Both had "fill it yourself" operations on site. They both used to charge (hang onto your wallets) 25 cents per gallon. Nestle came in, bought one, + raised it this year to 50 cents. Now everybody goes to the one still with the original price. [--I love CT*. :)] Poland Spring, an original New England fav, isn't any better. The largest river in our state is the Connecticut which extends north to Canada. The large H20 companies go to the local river towns, contract them for a pittance and pump incredible amounts into their plastic bottles. Now especially, in the times of climate change we have to be smarter all around. Say, what's the newly discovered remains body count on that Nev. lake?...

Just as important, Nestle has drawn a lot of attention from animal organizations because of employee cow abuse at its various, large, dairy operations. This is not udder nonsense, or bs! More than one whistleblower video may still be online. When you see them don't think of the jingle you heard as a kid or that peppy rabbit. Its time somebody took a notch out of that tarnished Nestle halo.:cool:

*- Someday I'll have to relate the ultimately abridged story of Glastonbury (Conn.) Spring. Glastonbury, home of the Pequot Soda Co. Hmmm.
 

UnderMiner

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Nestle is buying water rights big and small all over the US. (Foreign?) In the town of Meriden, CT (approx. 80K) there were two family run water companies. Both had "fill it yourself" operations on site. They both used to charge (hang onto your wallets) 25 cents per gallon. Nestle came in, bought one, + raised it this year to 50 cents. Now everybody goes to the one still with the original price. [--I love CT*. :)] Poland Spring, an original New England fav, isn't any better. The largest river in our state is the Connecticut which extends north to Canada. The large H20 companies go to the local river towns, contract them for a pittance and pump incredible amounts into their plastic bottles. Now especially, in the times of climate change we have to be smarter all around. Say, what's the newly discovered remains body count on that Nev. lake?...

Just as important, Nestle has drawn a lot of attention from animal organizations because of employee cow abuse at its various, large, dairy operations. This is not udder nonsense, or bs! More than one whistleblower video may still be online. When you see them don't think of the jingle you heard as a kid or that peppy rabbit. Its time somebody took a notch out of that tarnished Nestle halo.:cool:

*- Someday I'll have to relate the ultimately abridged story of Glastonbury (Conn.) Spring. Glastonbury, home of the Pequot Soda Co. Hmmm.
Wow, didn't know it was that bad. Surprised an armed militia hasn't stormed the Nestle corporation yet. God knows if this was happening in the 1770's there would already be water riots and executives being tarred and feathered.
 
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hemihampton

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Didn't Flint sell their "good water" to the Nestle corporation? I know Nestle purchased the water rights of some big city, I think it was Flint but I could be wrong. So Nestle bottled the good water and then sold it back to the population in bottles at a 10,000% profit while the relatively free Flint tap water was poisonous.
NO, Nestle or one of the big Water Company's had there own spring way up north farther from Flint but was nice enough to donate for free millions of Bottles to Flint. LEON.
 

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