I got a rock

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BF109

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My first thought was coprolite but I don't know.
 

tolmanbridge

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Definitely granite. Definitely not an egg. I have owned segnosaur, titanosaur, hadrosaur, and raptor style eggs or partial eggs from South America, North America and China. They are totally different. Also owned or still own coprolites (dinosaur, turtle, crocodile, carnivore mammal). It is not a coprolite.
 

cordilleran

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I'll go with granite. The specimen is characteristic of intrusive igneous rocks and one can identify on visual inspection the quartzite inclusions formed in concert with two distinct kinds of feldspar (plagioclase and potassium-rich potash feldspar). As for origin, I'd call your orbicular rock a "geofact." A geofact (a portmanteau of geology and artifact) is nothing more than a natural stone formation that is often most difficult to distinguish from a man-made artifact. Isn't earth science a hoot?
 

Mailman1960

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I'll go with granite. The specimen is characteristic of intrusive igneous rocks and one can identify on visual inspection the quartzite inclusions formed in concert with two distinct kinds of feldspar (plagioclase and potassium-rich potash feldspar). As for origin, I'd call your orbicular rock a "geofact." A geofact (a portmanteau of geology and artifact) is nothing more than a natural stone formation that is often most difficult to distinguish from a man-made artifact. Isn't earth science a hoot?
That's a lot to take in.

Giddy Up!!!!
 

Johnny M

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I'll go with granite. The specimen is characteristic of intrusive igneous rocks and one can identify on visual inspection the quartzite inclusions formed in concert with two distinct kinds of feldspar (plagioclase and potassium-rich potash feldspar). As for origin, I'd call your orbicular rock a "geofact." A geofact (a portmanteau of geology and artifact) is nothing more than a natural stone formation that is often most difficult to distinguish from a man-made artifact. Isn't earth science a hoot?
Thanks for your opinion professor! :)
 

maryrobb1

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One rock.....
Don't have to be a dick and brag...




Only joking!
I'm no geologist, so I can't help..
I have to deal with so many rocks, it isn't funny!

There are some incredibly smart folks on here..
Hopefully one will chime in?
I believe it geo special cutter to cut it open and there's crystals in it
 

Harry Pristis

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I have a similar granitic cobble in my rock garden. It was in a small pile of such rounded stones on the bottom of a Florida coastal river (it had barnacles). I think it was ballast dumped to accommodate a cargo. Florida doesn't have native granite.
 

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