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Fenndango

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It's got 3 pieces (top is missing) so it's under M-3XXX

M stands for Multipart

Wont be able to get the height and width without the top but search through the
M-3XXX section here: https://allinsulators.com/photos/Porcelain/M/

Looks like an Ohio Brass company glaze to me. I'd day 1910's.
 

CanadianBottles

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I've started to keep an eye out for those - most of the ones I've seen the graphics have oretty well become sun faded or worn off. I'll be sure to look for any that are in solid shape.
With the beverage cans that are old enough to be very collectible, you will almost never find them with good-looking graphics in a dump. What you should keep an eye out for are cone top cans or flat-top cans which are rusty but not heavily corroded. Even if there's absolutely zero visible paint on them, they can end up fully legible once they're soaked in acid.
 

Sitcoms

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With the beverage cans that are old enough to be very collectible, you will almost never find them with good-looking graphics in a dump. What you should keep an eye out for are cone top cans or flat-top cans which are rusty but not heavily corroded. Even if there's absolutely zero visible paint on them, they can end up fully legible once they're soaked in acid.
Yup - taken back quite a few that are still solid structural wise, but have no graphics and brought at least some if it back via lemon juice/a quick dip in CLR. Latest was an older orange juice can; sadly most of the oil cans (almost exclusively Esso brand) are aluminum and lost the graphics long ago.

It's actually amazing at how few old beer cans I find in the '47-62 dump. I'm not sure if they've just rotted away or were crushed (there are spots the iron layer is quite thick), or if this dump simply didn't have a lot of them.
 

CanadianBottles

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Yup - taken back quite a few that are still solid structural wise, but have no graphics and brought at least some if it back via lemon juice/a quick dip in CLR. Latest was an older orange juice can; sadly most of the oil cans (almost exclusively Esso brand) are aluminum and lost the graphics long ago.

It's actually amazing at how few old beer cans I find in the '47-62 dump. I'm not sure if they've just rotted away or were crushed (there are spots the iron layer is quite thick), or if this dump simply didn't have a lot of them.
I think part of it was that back in the early can era, cans just weren't the most common thing for people to drink from. I'm not old enough to remember the cone top/flat top era, but I can't remember many movies from before the mid-1960s or so which show people drinking from cans outside of fishing/camping scenes. I associate cans in that era more with rural areas where it was harder for bottlers to get their glass bottles returned. I'm not sure that there would have been much reason to use cans in a sizable town, they would likely have been an added cost to the bottler if their glass bottles had a good return rate, plus people generally prefer to drink out of glass when it's convenient.

This is just speculation of course though, I'd be curious if anyone here who remembers the 1950s could chime in on how much cans were a part of daily life in urban areas.
 

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