U S MAIL

Welcome to our Antique Bottle community

Be a part of something great, join today!

historic-antiques

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2017
Messages
88
Reaction score
40
Points
18
Can anyone tell me how common or uncommon these bottles are?

What sizes do they come in?
This one is 9 inches tall.

Any thoughts on what looks like a double stamping on the bottom.

Ball park value. Thanks, Roy
From the conversation here, looks like you hit the jackpot with a really neat bottle!!!! Great find!!! $500-$800, even without the paper label.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Roy

Roy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2022
Messages
363
Reaction score
465
Points
63
Great bottle...maybe you can get a reproduction sticker made...place it on your bottle and sell it for $1,300. I bet you that bottle is worth $500. as-is purplish. Great find.
TexasRancher,
Thank you, I had never seen one of these before and had no idea what it might be worth but the price was right (nowhere near $500.) so I bought it.
Roy
 

Roy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2022
Messages
363
Reaction score
465
Points
63
From the conversation here, looks like you hit the jackpot with a really neat bottle!!!! Great find!!! $500-$800, even without the paper label.
historic-antiques,

Thank you.
At first glance I wasn't even sure it was old, but it certainly is. I only had to tumble the interior, never did anything but wash the outside. A 3 day tumble and its in perfect condition minus a label.

Roy
 
  • Like
Reactions: Len

Len

CT LEN
Joined
Nov 14, 2020
Messages
979
Reaction score
812
Points
93
Roy,
Great find! I suggest you obtain more boxes from that source! Congrats.:)
..Thanks to all the members who contributed their skills in solving Roy's mystery.:cool:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Roy

Semar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 5, 2023
Messages
157
Reaction score
152
Points
43
I found this w/a search on US mailboxes;.
Something must have inspired the maker to construct a mold like this; could it be related to or celebate the introduction of a new style of mailbox?
Just throwing this out there.

By 1891 the U.S. Post Office Department had over 48,400 letter boxes of various types in use around the country. When postal officials accepted this style box, developed by Eugene D. Scheble, a dentist from Toledo, Ohio, the postal system encountered a great deal of trouble. Illegal deals were involved in the selection of the mailbox. Ultimately several prominent persons were indicted by a grand jury in 1903 on charges of conspiracy and fraud in connection with the letter box contracts, but not before more than 49,300 Scheble style boxes had been purchased. The Scheble mailbox was made of sheet metal, not iron.
The Van Dorn Iron Works of Cleveland, Ohio, was selected to make better boxes. Although Van Dorn boxes were known for their durability to weather, they were rather homely in appearance. Despite the fact that some models were "spruced up" by the addition of fancier handles, they were generally so unattractive that in some cities local postmasters were requested, if not absolutely required, to remove them from boulevards, avenues, and streets where the letter boxes were out of harmony with the ornate electric lampposts then in use.
scheble.jpg
 
Last edited:

Members online

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
83,099
Messages
742,219
Members
24,088
Latest member
Seabass
Top