Unexpected early find in the forrest near my house!

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hemihampton

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CanadianBottles

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You've got some nice finds there! Could I see a closeup of that perfume bottle that's lying on its side? I don't recognize that one, I'm guessing it's a Crown Perfumery competitor. And that Edward VII coronation stopper is great! I wonder what the rest of the bottle looked like.
Also, could you post a picture of that Coca Cola bottle, including the base? I'm sure that's a common one for you over there but I'm always curious about what Coke bottles looked like in other countries and I don't think I remember seeing a UK one before.
 

CanadianBottles

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Hi "Jack" - if bottles you find have 2 mold seams from the bottom, that go to the top, and if the seams stop before the lip/top they are 99% chance of being pre-1903 bottles because the automatic bottle machine was invented in 1903, and 99% of bottles after that had mold seams that go through the lips to the very top. Before 1903 bottles had hand-appplied lips, placed separately on a blown-in-mold bottle. Thus, the mold seam does NOT go into the lips. The automatic bottle machines blew the bottle and formed the top in one mold - nothing hand-applied - and thus the seams go through the lips. You can also look up the names embossed on your bottles to see when companies existed. There are other ways of finding approximate dates of bottles, like if it's a 3-piece mold seamed bottle, or turn-mold bottle, or free-blown, open pontiled; or graphite pontiled, etc. However what I told you above is the very basic way most of us collectors first learned regarding how to date our bottles.
Remember, just because the automatic bottle machine was invented in 1903 does not mean that everyone was using one in 1904. It's the same as how the laptop was introduced in 1982, but how many people do you know who were using laptops (let alone any sort of personal computer) in the early 80s? ABM bottles gradually replaced BIM bottles throughout the 1900s-1920s in North America as factories upgraded their equipment, and in the UK it took even longer - I'm not sure if they had even fully stopped making BIM bottles by WWII.
 
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Thank you very much for the attention! At the minute, I am out at my college, but I will be sure to stick some pictures on there later. The Crown Perfumery Bottles were bought as a set. The lot was sold to me for £25 in my local charity shop. I knew they were valuable but just never had the time to sit and go through it online. I don’t know too much about Coke’s, although it was found in the creek near my house, and a lot of detail has sadly worn away on the bottom. I’ll put some close ups on there later but I believe it to be late 50’s early 60’s. That was found with my dad too! Yeah but overall I was really happy with my finds. Found a broken bottom of a cobalt embossed poison which was sad to see broken, but a keeper nonetheless. Thank you for being a good community and supporting my growth in bottle collecting,
Many thanks,
Jack
 
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As promised, some close-ups of the crown perfumery bottles, and the Coca Cola bottle from the creek. The crown perfumery bottles are apparently difficult to find? I picked up all 5 for £25 at my local Charity Shop, and wondered if you guys had any idea on the value of them. Anyways, went back to the dump on the way home from school on my bike, and pulled a lovely blob-top (Probably a beer or a soda) and a really nice ink-pot. Will be attaching all images at bottom!
 

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Hi again folks. Some more nice finds at the tip! I got back down to the tip on my lunch break and had a surface look for some old pottery so I can go home and research to find an age. So, I collected some of the nicest samples and made my way back to the school. I noticed old looking glass along the ditches on the way back, so I hopped down and dig a few out. Sadly most were broken, but there was one complete bottle. Bearing in mind this is not too far from the tip, but all these old lanes are full of old relics in the ditches. Anyways, I’ll put some pics at the bottom for you more experienced bottlers to investigate, but I’m guessing very late 1700’s to mid 1800’s? Any ideas or suggestions of age and value would be nice, and thought I’d add that there is some sort of horse shoe embodiment on the front of the bottle!
Thanks in advance,
Jack
 

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CanadianBottles

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I think you did pretty well getting those Crown Perfumery bottles for 25 pounds! I'm not sure how much they typically sell for, might depend on the size somewhat, but I'm quite certain it's more than five pounds each.
Nice pictorial embossing on that blob top, can you make out what it shows? Looks like a late-19th century soda bottle.
Hi again folks. Some more nice finds at the tip! I got back down to the tip on my lunch break and had a surface look for some old pottery so I can go home and research to find an age. So, I collected some of the nicest samples and made my way back to the school. I noticed old looking glass along the ditches on the way back, so I hopped down and dig a few out. Sadly most were broken, but there was one complete bottle. Bearing in mind this is not too far from the tip, but all these old lanes are full of old relics in the ditches. Anyways, I’ll put some pics at the bottom for you more experienced bottlers to investigate, but I’m guessing very late 1700’s to mid 1800’s? Any ideas or suggestions of age and value would be nice, and thought I’d add that there is some sort of horse shoe embodiment on the front of the bottle!
Thanks in advance,
Jack
That's a Benedictine bottle, it's an herbal liqueur from France introduced in the mid-19th century. Yours probably dates to around 1890-1920ish, these changed so little over the years that it's hard to tell, but tooled lip bottles like that weren't used before the latter part of the 19th century. Anything from the 18th century is going to be very crude, usually blown without using a mold at all, and it'll be much harder to find any intact glass that old. Most of what you find while exploring the countryside isn't going to be much older than the 1870s or so when the use of disposable bottles started greatly increasing.
 

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