Did my cust give me any decent bottles, or did she just have me take away trash

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CCB420

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I could barely make out writing on 5 but it says re-use of this bottle is prohibited, just not the "federal law prohibits..." that I typically see on bottles! Just worded differently
 

Hezezilla

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I could barely make out writing on 5 but it says re-use of this bottle is prohibited, just not the "federal law prohibits..." that I typically see on bottles! Just worded differently
So single use bottles started around the late
1930s but really started catching on around the start of WW2. That means #5 is roughly post 1940 if not even later. Again, please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

CCB420

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Oh I know I can't correct you!! I am green, I don't know anything hoevir maeven
 

CCB420

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That last one......yea I don't know what's up with that language! I was trying to say I need some education on what to look for, what methods of bottle making leave which marks, etc! Is there a site or a graphic of some kind of a timeline as to which method leaves which marks?
 

Hezezilla

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That last one......yea I don't know what's up with that language! I was trying to say I need some education on what to look for, what methods of bottle making leave which marks, etc! Is there a site or a graphic of some kind of a timeline as to which method leaves which marks?
I myself am a beginner as well. I just know a whole bunch about the bottle terminology and such. The main thing you want to look for on bottles is whether or not the mold seam stops short of the lip or if it goes all the way up. If the seam stops short of the neck, it is an applied top that usually dates to pre-1920. Another way you can tell if a bottle is an applied top is if the lip is uneven or has a different texture from the rest of the bottle. I've been told that not all applied lips were created equally and to never use the term "BIMAL" (blown in mold, applied lip) as an overarching term. There are differences, I just happen to not know what they are.

If the seam goes all the way up across the lip or surrounds it in a ring, it is a machine-made bottle. Most of these are post-1920 although machines were made as early as 1910 or so. I've been told that the manufacturing methods of machined pieces changed a few times between 1910-1925. The difference in method led to differences in a variety of things that I have not been educated on.

If there is embossing of the manufacturer's stamps, you can look at https://glassbottlemarks.com/. One of the very easy ways to tell the age of a bottle is to know the various stamps used, when they were used, and the date codes. A good example would be Owens-Illinois-produced bottles. The O-I in a diamond logo is very common on bottles. It was used specifically from 1929 until roughly 1954. Date codes are kind of hard to explain so refer to page 11 of this PDF: https://sha.org/bottle/pdffiles/OwensIll_BLockhart.pdf. This has helped me to age dumps or thrift store finds extremely quickly.

The oldest bottles will always have pontil marks. It's basically a semi-deep gouge in the base of the bottle. They are usually rough and uneven but sometimes the pontil scars were tooled. These older bottles will also have applied lips. Pontils are mainly pre-1850 I believe. But, I have actually never seen one in person.

All of these questions have been answered at one time or another on this forum. It's a matter of conducting dedicated research. That's why even though I know a lot, there's still a lot I do not know. If you aren't a fan of research, find a veteran in your local area to talk to. Bottle clubs and Facebook groups are the easiest way to find such people.

Happy Hunting.

- Hezekiah
 

CCB420

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Yea this and my coin collecting forum are about the extent of my social media! Never been on fakebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc, and not gonna start now unless it was a life or death situation!! Would probably still think about it a while if that situation arose!!

As far as research, I just have very little patience when it comes to search engines! Waaaaayyyy to much bs pops up when you ask a simple question, plus when I do find a result that looks like what I'm wanting.....they want $ or ss#, credit card info, mother's maiden name, favorite pet, which way you put toilet paper on the dispenser, etc etc etc! Maybe I'm lazy, stupid, or both but it's way easier asking an actual person!
 

CCB420

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But thank you for the response I'll definitely check out the links
 

CCB420

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Sorry it took so long but here's some better pics, I FINALLY got my replacement phone
 

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