White acl 7up.

ROBBYBOBBY64

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I just got this full white label acl 7up bottle. 1943 Owen Illinois date code. Plant code #3 Fairmont, West Virginia. This one is from Anderson South Carolina 7-up bottling co. Red color used on traditional swimsuit bottles was not used because of it being needed for WWII. Hope you like it.
ROBBYBOBBY64.

 

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iggyworf

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Nice! I have a bunch like that in my 7up collection. Some of them have a 'ghost' reflection of the red paint that wore off. And some look like there was no red paint at all.
 

shadeone

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Threads that may be relevant to this with regards to the "rationing" of paint:

 

SODABOB

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The attached article should shed some light on the topic about the so-called all white 7-Up bottles. Scroll past the Sources section towards the end and read Appendix A. Bill Lockhart and myself compiled this study in 2019. As you will see, Bill refers to some of his earlier claims about the all white bottles, but revises that information in this new study. As far as we know, this is the most extensive study ever published on the topic. I hope you enjoy it and that it helps set the record straight.

Bob


 

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MCglass

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I can't help but wonder if the problem, in large part was due to a problem with the pigmented frit baking onto the glass properly. There seem to be examples of missing red labels with, and without the ghost image left behind. As if the annealing process would not always etch the surface of the glass beneath the color applied, perhaps depending on the temperature of the ovens.
It is clear, that after the war, bottle companies began to lay an all white application of the label, and then applied colors over the white portions they wanted colored. See post bubble-girl 7up and Mountain Dew labels, off the top of my head. These applications seemed to stick much better to the white base than to the bare glass, although soils can still remove and fade colors dramatically.
 

treeguyfred

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Bill Lockhart and myself compiled this study in 2019
Hey Bob! thank you for again posting this article, it's both very informative and easy reading with great pictures (me likey pictures)! I've read and reread through a few times now and awhile ago. This is the second time it's been posted, that I know of (maybe more). I'm wondering if there is a spot for it to be permanently attached here in the forum.
Super nice work and thank you and Bill for your efforts!
~Fred
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

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Just like Bob said. I looked really close at the bottle and it definitely had the red paint at one time. There are scratches around the spot the red was, leaving a shinier square of glass. There is no red at all left.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

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